Feature

APLNG project reaches milestone

ALL HAPPENING: Steel fixer Nathan Tabb shows a guest around the construction site on Curtis Island, Gladstone.
ALL HAPPENING: Steel fixer Nathan Tabb shows a guest around the construction site on Curtis Island, Gladstone.

Australia Pacific LNG has announced the addition of a second 4.5 million tonne per annum production train for its Curtis Island project, bringing the total investment in the project to around $23 billion.

The Australia Pacific LNG project currently employs 4,000 people, mostly in Queensland, and will create 6,000 construction jobs and 1,000 operational jobs for the ongoing operation of the project.

Construction of the Curtis Island facility commenced in May last year, with works on schedule for initial exports mid 2015.

Exports from the second train are expected to commence the following year.

Australia Pacific LNG Chief Executive Officer, Page Maxson said the decision to add the second train was an important milestone for the project, and was the final step in the project's approvals process.

"Substantial progress has already been made on our project in the gas fields, along the pipeline and at the liquefaction facility; and with this final approval in place, we are on track to supply our customers with a cleaner-burning and reliable energy source," Mr Maxson said.

"We are focussed on ensuring Queensland benefits from this project through the creation of opportunities for suppliers and contractors, and to date we have spent more than $2.3 billion with local companies."

Australia Pacific LNG's investments through its Social Impact Management Plan will provide significant contributions to the further development of regional capabilities in areas such as education, health and business development. These contributions will also help in developing social infrastructure such as affordable housing and airport upgrades.

The project requires drilling and establishing 10,000 gas wells in the Bowen and Surat Basins over the next 30 years, the construction of a 530km gas transmission pipeline, and the construction of the export facility on Curtis Island.

A peak workforce of approximately 6,000 workers will be required during the development and construction phase and approximately 1,000 during the operational phase of the project, with workers required from a range of areas, including:

  • geosciences
  • pipeline workers
  • rig operators
  • landowner support teams
  • indigenous and community affairs
  • site managers
  • operations crews
  • field and plant operators
  • engineers
  • jetty subcontractors
  • builders, electrical and instrument trades
  • painting, fireproofing and insulation workers
  • safety and risk advisors
  • surveyors, project managers
  • health and safety advisors
  • tank workers and environmental scientists

Thinking about a career in the LNG industry? Here are four of the major contributors to the APLNG project:

Topics:  energy, lng projects, mining, resources



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