Lifestyle

Cancer survival improves, but diagnoses also increase

SURVIVAL rates for most types of cancer are continuing to improve, but the number of people diagnosed with the dreaded disease has increased dramatically.

A report released by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare on Tuesday showed five-year survival from all cancers combined increased from 47% in 1982-1987 to 66% in 2006-2010.

Further, Australians diagnosed with cancer generally have better survival prospects compared with people living in other countries.

The cancers that had the largest survival gains were prostate cancer, kidney cancer and non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

But gains in survival were not consistent across all cancers, with some that already had low survival in 1982-1987 showing only small gains. These included mesothelioma, brain, pancreatic and lung cancers.

The number of new cancer cases diagnosed in Australia each year almost doubled between 1991 and 2009, from 66,000 to 114,000. This number is expected to rise to around 121,000 this year.

AIHW spokeswoman Lisa McGlynn said this trend could be attributed to a number of factors.

"This increasing trend is primarily due to rises in the number of cases of prostate cancer, breast cancer in females, bowel cancer and lung cancer, and is partly explained by the aging and increasing size of the population," Ms McGlynn said.

The most common cancers expected to be diagnosed in 2012 are prostate cancer, followed by bowel cancer, breast cancer, melanoma of the skin and lung cancer.

Ms McGlynn said one in two Australians would be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetime, with the disease accounting for about three in 10 deaths in Australia in 2010.

In fact it was the second most common cause of death behind cardiovascular diseases.

The report showed cancer outcomes differed across population groups.

Incidence rates and survival were lower for people living in remote areas compared with those in major cities, while mortality rates rose with increasing remoteness.

The incidence rate for all cancers combined was highest in Queensland (516 per 100,000) and lowest in the Northern Territory (442 per 100,000) from 2004-2008.

Topics:  australian institute of health and welfare, cancer, survival



Join the Community.

Get your local news, your way.

Stay Connected

Update your news preferences and get the latest news delivered to your inbox.

Calm weather with up to two-metre swells at Tweed

Waves might look like this.

Surf conditions for the beach this weekend.

Feast of street food trucks into Harbour

FEAST FOR FOODIES: Mat Whalley, Kat Creasey, Chico Green and Trevor Braga from Food Kartel and Destination Tweed CEO Bill Tatchell are looking forward to the Tweed Food Truck Extravaganza.

Food Trucks will descend on Tweed Heads for a street food fiesta

Upmarket beach townhouse

Real Estate: 4/45 Kingscliff Street, Kingscliff NSW.

Take a look inside this stylish Kingscliff townhouse conversion

Latest deals and offers


British family bashed in Thailand

Family beaten and kicked unconscious by gang in Thailand.

Family beaten and kicked unconscious by gang in Thailand.

Ben Hunt wary of Sharks Halfback

Ben Hunt of the Broncos looks to pass during the round 23 NRL match between the Brisbane Broncos and the St George Illawarra Dragons at Suncorp Stadium.

Ben Hunt talks about Cronulla's Chad Townsend.

Broncos prepare for Sharks

Defensive training session at the Broncos

Tough defensive session in preparation for Sharks game.

How a sacked real estate agent made $725k in four months

Agent is now under investigation by the industry watchdog

VIDEO: Art Deco fan pays $835,000 for Imperial Hotel

No Caption

Iconic "Impy" sold at a bargan price to bidder who loves Art Deco.

RBA warns of future apartment oversupply

Toowoomba: Crest Apartments and Burke & Wills, Ruthven Street ( view from Neil Street) Photo Bev Lacey / The Chronicle

RBA says oversupply of apartments poses risk to household finances