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Council refuses Sexton Hill

Traffic flowing in both directions on the new Banora Point Pacific Highway upgrade.
Traffic flowing in both directions on the new Banora Point Pacific Highway upgrade. John Gass

TWEED Shire Council is continuing its scrap with the State Government over road funding by refusing to accept responsibility for maintaining the old highway at Sexton Hill.

The NSW Government was responsible for the Pacific Hwy but with the Banora Point Bypass the route over Sexton Hill is no longer part of the highway and would be reclassified as a local road.

The refusal to accept the reclassification was a protest to the state government over road funding in the Tweed.

The NSW Department of Roads and Maritime Services (RMS) classifies arterial and sub-arterial roads within major urban centres of over 100,000 population as state and regional roads and provides funding for their maintenance.

According to the council, the RMS had informed the council that with a population of just over 90,000 the Tweed did not qualify as a major urban centre and must maintain urban arterial roads within its boundaries.

Tweed mayor Barry Longland said councillors were unanimous in the view that the Tweed forms a geographically continuous urban area with the Gold Coast with a population of more than 600,000.

"The Tweed is the largest growth area in the state and no account is being given to already approved developments which will take us well over the 100,000 mark," Cr Longland said.

"We have funded the expansion of our own arterial road network through Section 94 developer contributions but these are proving to be insufficient to the growth we need, forcing us to delay projects such as the badly needed upgrade of Kennedy Dr.

"We are also in the situation of having to build our own highway interchanges like the one at Kirkwood Rd which makes us unique across the state."

A RMS spokeswoman said the department was discussing the classification of roads adjacent to and affected by the Banora Point Pacific Hwy upgrade with Tweed Shire Council.

"RMS will take into account as part of the discussions with council, traffic generated between Tweed Heads and the Gold Coast," the spokeswoman said.

"Broadly-based road classification reviews are carried out about every 10 years to ensure changes in road use are reflected in RMS programs and funding.

"These reviews involve all NSW councils to ensure the outcomes are equitable for everyone."

Topics:  nsw government, sexton hill, tweed shire council



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