News

Council refuses Sexton Hill

Traffic flowing in both directions on the new Banora Point Pacific Highway upgrade.
Traffic flowing in both directions on the new Banora Point Pacific Highway upgrade. John Gass

TWEED Shire Council is continuing its scrap with the State Government over road funding by refusing to accept responsibility for maintaining the old highway at Sexton Hill.

The NSW Government was responsible for the Pacific Hwy but with the Banora Point Bypass the route over Sexton Hill is no longer part of the highway and would be reclassified as a local road.

The refusal to accept the reclassification was a protest to the state government over road funding in the Tweed.

The NSW Department of Roads and Maritime Services (RMS) classifies arterial and sub-arterial roads within major urban centres of over 100,000 population as state and regional roads and provides funding for their maintenance.

According to the council, the RMS had informed the council that with a population of just over 90,000 the Tweed did not qualify as a major urban centre and must maintain urban arterial roads within its boundaries.

Tweed mayor Barry Longland said councillors were unanimous in the view that the Tweed forms a geographically continuous urban area with the Gold Coast with a population of more than 600,000.

"The Tweed is the largest growth area in the state and no account is being given to already approved developments which will take us well over the 100,000 mark," Cr Longland said.

"We have funded the expansion of our own arterial road network through Section 94 developer contributions but these are proving to be insufficient to the growth we need, forcing us to delay projects such as the badly needed upgrade of Kennedy Dr.

"We are also in the situation of having to build our own highway interchanges like the one at Kirkwood Rd which makes us unique across the state."

A RMS spokeswoman said the department was discussing the classification of roads adjacent to and affected by the Banora Point Pacific Hwy upgrade with Tweed Shire Council.

"RMS will take into account as part of the discussions with council, traffic generated between Tweed Heads and the Gold Coast," the spokeswoman said.

"Broadly-based road classification reviews are carried out about every 10 years to ensure changes in road use are reflected in RMS programs and funding.

"These reviews involve all NSW councils to ensure the outcomes are equitable for everyone."

Topics:  nsw government, sexton hill, tweed shire council



Join the Community.

Get your local news, your way.

Stay Connected

Update your news preferences and get the latest news delivered to your inbox.

Purple Tweed for midwives’ celebration

Midwives, students and staff from Tweed Hospital's Maternity Ward celebrated International Midwives Day on Thursday.

Tweed Hospital turns purple for midwives

Flying high for national tour

The Angels will perform at Twin Towns Services Club in Tweed Heads in July.

Choosing from their hits is a mammoth task for The Angels

Man bailed after 15 years on the run

A man has faced court after 15 years on the run.

A Sydney man on the run for 15 years has been granted bail

Latest deals and offers


Blake Lively Film Shot on Gold Coast

Blake Lively in The Shallows.

New trailer for shark thriller The Shallows starring Blake Lively.

Dash Cam of Head-on Crash

Head-on crash after overtaking in fog.

Disaster as driver overtakes in fog at night.

Spirit of Tasmania Ferry in Rough Seas

Rough seas toss ferry around.

Passengers scream as ferry rides through high seas.

How a sacked real estate agent made $725k in four months

Agent is now under investigation by the industry watchdog

VIDEO: Art Deco fan pays $835,000 for Imperial Hotel

No Caption

Iconic "Impy" sold at a bargan price to bidder who loves Art Deco.

RBA warns of future apartment oversupply

Toowoomba: Crest Apartments and Burke & Wills, Ruthven Street ( view from Neil Street) Photo Bev Lacey / The Chronicle

RBA says oversupply of apartments poses risk to household finances