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Flying fox deaths spark urge for orchard netting vigilance

Greg Wallace, National Parks and Wildlife Senior Ranger and the dead flying foxes. Photo: Rob Wright/The Coffs Coast Advocate
Greg Wallace, National Parks and Wildlife Senior Ranger and the dead flying foxes. Photo: Rob Wright/The Coffs Coast Advocate

ORCHARDISTS are being urged to be more vigilant about the maintenance of protective netting.

About 40 grey-headed and black flying foxes died after being caught in 20-year-old orchard netting at Bonville, but thanks to the combined efforts of WIRES and the National Parks and Wildlife Service, three adults and a pup were saved and are now in care.

According to the service's Lawrence Orel, those animals have a good prognosis

"The team from WIRES said they believe those animals will recover quickly and will be able to be returned to the wild," Mr Orel said.

"I believe the farmer had planned to take the nets out this summer, and that must be the message that comes out of this situation.

"To protect wlidlife either fully maintain netting or decommission it. The worst case is when netting is allow to slacken and become loose. That is when it is potentially dangerous to wildlife."

Topics:  flying fox, national parks and wildlife services, orchard protective netting, wires


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