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Lack of legal race tracks and bad attitudes behind hooning

Addiction to speed and selfishness fuels hoons
Addiction to speed and selfishness fuels hoons Christopher Chan GLADV251112ESSA

DRIVING instructors say bad attitudes on the road and a lack of legal race tracks are fuelling hoon behaviour around the Tweed.

Tweed Heads driving instructors might be able to teach good driving skills and etiquette, but apparently some people are just inherently bad drivers.

A combination of selfishness on the road, an addiction to speed and a lack of legal outlets for car enthusiasts have turned some of our streets into a petrol powered free-for-all.

Guaranteed Driving School's Greg Connell said that while he can teach people the mechanics of driving it is often much more difficult to change attitudes toward road use.

"It all boils down to attitude and also peer pressure," Mr Connell said

"If they've got a bad attitude they don't care about anyone else."

Mr Connell said that over confidence was also an issue and some young males were driving beyond their capacity to control their vehicle.

"Once a learner gets out behind a wheel by themselves their confidence grows quickly," he said.

"Get some mates in a car with a guy who just got his license and his friends will encourage him to act recklessly."

Mr Connell suggested more police on patrol and a change in society's attitudes toward fast cars and dangerous manoeuvres.

"It's like drink driving, it's been drummed into our heads that its wrong and the roads are better for it," he said.

"You've got people who are addicted to speed.

"They'll get caught and unless their cars get taken they'll keep doing it."

Budget Driver Training's Paul Lambert agreed hooning was an issue in the area.

"In a lot of places with dead ends I see a lot of tyre tracks (from burnouts)," he said.

Mr Lambert said that giving people an outlet for silly behaviour was the best way to curb hooning.

"It's a bit along the lines of running with Pamplona bulls," he said.

"We need facilities for young people to do daft things."

The Tweed driving instructor knew the cost would be prohibitive, but thought it was a smart solution.

"Find somewhere to facilitate the drivers who do it (hoon)," he said.

"We're talking big money but something needs to be sorted out."

Do you think hooning is a problem?

This poll ended on 18 February 2013.

Yes - 70%

No - 29%

This is not a scientific poll. The results reflect only the opinions of those who chose to participate.

Topics:  hooning


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