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Museum revamp creates buzz

Judy Kean holding keys to the Murwillumbah Museum to signify the completion of its renovations.
Judy Kean holding keys to the Murwillumbah Museum to signify the completion of its renovations. Nolan Verheij-Full

MANY locals appeared to re-discover their region's history as they inspected the new look Tweed Regional Museum which on Saturday re-opened after a $3.3-million facelift.

Kevin Dickson, who used to look after the radio room in the old museum, said the new display, was far removed from the cramped, packed space of the former facility.

"The concept they have for displaying these things is great," Mr Dickson said.

Tweed Regional Museum, Murwillumbah. Photo: Nolan Verheij-Full / Tweed Daily News
Tweed Regional Museum, Murwillumbah. Photo: Nolan Verheij-Full / Tweed Daily News Nolan Verheij-full

Former mayor and patron of the Murwillumbah Historical Society Max Boyd said the historical societies had played a huge role in making the revamped museum possible.

"I thank them all for saving what so easily could or would have been lost," Mr Boyd said.

Tweed Heads Historical Society member Ray Duke, who donated a red delivery bike to the collection, said the new space was 'terrific'.

"I think you can really see how this is going to service the community well into the future," museum director Judy Kean said.

there was a good turnout at the Tweed Regional Museum Opening. Photo: Nolan Verheij-Full / Tweed Daily News
there was a good turnout at the Tweed Regional Museum Opening. Photo: Nolan Verheij-Full / Tweed Daily News Nolan Verheij-full
 

It's indisputable that the collection stole the show, but architect Paul Berkemeier said that was precisely the point.

"This is one of the best examples of local government making a local museum work," Mr Berkemeier said.

Uki and South Arm Historical Society president Helena Duckworth said the new space meant they could more readily engage schools in local history.

Society secretary Esma Thompson said: "I think it's brilliant. You can actually see the exhibit."

"It's really interesting when you can see the story that goes with an object," volunteer Jayne Parrott said.

Ms Parrott said the possibilities of rotating the collection so people kept returning were great.

Front-of-house volunteer Gerry Matthews said he w

as thrilled to be part of such a significant project. "I think it's very important," he said.

Ray Duke next to a Banana growers food delivery bike he donated at the openeing of the Tweed Regional Museum. Photo: Nolan Verheij-Full / Tweed Daily News
Ray Duke next to a Banana growers food delivery bike he donated at the openeing of the Tweed Regional Museum. Photo: Nolan Verheij-Full / Tweed Daily News Nolan Verheij-full
 

Topics:  history, museum, tweed regional museum



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