Feature

Roy Hill's million-dollar camp

 

AS early as April next year, 737s will be flying workers directly to Gina Rinehart's giant Roy Hill mine project in the Pilbara.

The on-site airport is just one facet of the massive project being undertaken to provide the facilities and infrastructure required to support the $9.5 billion project.

The mining camp will boast a movie theatre, sporting facilities, a bar and pool.

The $200 million camp will be home to up to 1715 foreign workers, with Hancock Prospecting having been granted permission to import labour, as domestic recruitment falls short.

The federal government granted an enterprise migration agreement for up to 1715 foreign workers for the three-year construction phase to fill places Australians could not be found to fill.

Roy Hill, however, is about to begin a national recruitment drive.

More than 6700 Australians will work on construction, with 2000 more taking on training places. Roy Hill intends to employ 2000 local workers for the next two decades.

The Chamber of Commerce and Industry in WA said few workers in the eastern states were taking up opportunities in WA mines.

Just 5257 mining workers fly-in, fly-out from other states, in an industry which employs more than 101,000 people.

"Traditionally WA has always had a significantly greater number of overseas workers coming to WA versus interstate," a chamber spokesman said.

"There are likely many reasons for this, including many reluctant to move away from support structures and family, concerns about social infrastructure like schooling and healthcare and the relative high living costs in WA.

"WA is the growth area of the economy and there are some fantastic opportunities for interstate workers to come to a dynamic and growing state that welcomes skilled workers with open arms."

Skilled foreign workers already in WA mines predominantly come from the UK, Ireland, the Philippines, the US, India, South Africa, China and Canada.

This year, the WA mining industry will need almost 120,000 workers, up from 75,000 three years ago, with the Pilbara region in need of 34,000 extra workers.

A fly-in fly-out welder can earn $100,000-$140,000 a year, an engineer $125,000-$170,000 and a manager $180,000-$285,000.

Learn more online: visit the Roy Hill project website

Topics:  gina rinehart, mining, resources, western australia



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