Sport

Serena overcomes sore ankle to take down Spaniard

SERENA Williams shrugged off concerns about her right ankle by dispatching 19-year-old Spaniard Garbine Muguruza 6-2 6-0 yesterday.

Despite the scoreline, the five-time Australian Open champion lacked her usual killer instinct, racking up 20 unforced errors compared to just 11 in her first round match.

The good news, however, was that her ankle, which she rolled during Tuesday's easy win against Romania's Edina Gallovits-Hall, survived the match thanks to a strict regimen of icing and massage.

"It feels better, I was just doing everything you can do (to get ready for today)," Williams said after the match.

While her ankle pulled up okay, the same couldn't be said for her lip which copped a whack from her own racquet on a follow through after hitting a defensive lob in the seventh game.

"One day I twist my ankle, today I hit myself in the face, I do not know what's going to happen on Saturday. Hopefully I just hit some winners," she said.

The tournament favourite will take on Japan's Ayumi Morita in the third round tomorrow after she beat Germany's Annika Beck 6-2 6-0.
 

Topics:  australian open, injury, serena williams, tennis



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