Here are 10 community news story you may have missed in Tweed last week.
Here are 10 community news story you may have missed in Tweed last week.

10 news stories you might have missed last week

1. Funding boost

TWO Tweed environmental organisations have received a boost in funding thanks to the NSW Government.

State Member for Tweed Geoff Provest last week announced Tweed Landcare and Fingal Head Coastcare will share in $179,962 in funding to continue their restoration and rehabilitation programs.

Mr Provest said a NSW Environmental Trust grant of $100,000 would help Tweed Landcare

continue their work with filling the biodiversity gaps connecting Tweed Coast to Border Ranges and Fingal Head Coastcare has been allocated $79,962 to continue their work restoring and protecting Fingal Headland Themeda Grasslands and significant bird habitats.

 

2. Support group

FIBROMYALGIA, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Information and Support Group resumes meetings on the first Friday of every month, starting July at 10:30am at the Community Centre, Cnr Heffron St and Minjungbal Dr, Tweed Heads South. All welcome. For further information call Bronwyn on (07) 5593 9319.

 

3. New playground

MURWILLUMBAH's All Saints Anglican Parish has received more than $100,000 in funding last week.

State Member for Lismore Janelle Saffin said the grant which will be used for to build an indoor playground.

The funding was part of a NSW Government initiative for community projects in regional NSW.

 

4. Art display despite Uki Public School's anniversary halted

THE coronavirus pandemic has put a halt to Uki Public School's 125th Anniversary meant to be held on the June long weekend.

COVID-19 restrictions postponed the celebration including a dance, reunion, school performances and a historical display until 2021.

The schoolchildren's artwork made for the postponed event along with some historic photos, are now on display at the Uki Post Office gallery.

 

Uki Public School's 125th Anniversary Celebration: Tyler (Kindergarten), Isla (Kindergarten), Arlia (Kindergarten), Maverick (Year 5), Ms Rachel Watkins (Principal), Indy (Year 3), Mrs Edna Kendrick (teacher). All students had at least one parent attend Uki Public School. Mrs Kendrick went to the school herself before coming back to teach. Photo: Scott Powick.
Uki Public School's 125th Anniversary Celebration: Tyler (Kindergarten), Isla (Kindergarten), Arlia (Kindergarten), Maverick (Year 5), Ms Rachel Watkins (Principal), Indy (Year 3), Mrs Edna Kendrick (teacher). All students had at least one parent attend Uki Public School. Mrs Kendrick went to the school herself before coming back to teach. Photo: Scott Powick.


The school has worked with the Uki and South Arm Historical Society to update its archives. As a result there are some historical photos featuring images of Uki Public School from 1895 - 1960s.

The art works were created by the children from Kindergarten through to Year 6.

Uki Public School's Jo Spiller said art was an important part of learning.

"The students' artistic experiences reflect, and are nurtured by, the creative community in which we live," Jo said.

"Students have used a range of different materials and techniques to design and make these artworks. We believe art education stimulates creativity and imagination. We are so pleased to be able to share our work with the local community."

 

5. Classic Aussie inventions on display at Museum reopening

THE Tweed Regional Museum will re-open tomorrow, June 30, with a new exhibition called 'Design Nation'.

Murwillumbah will be the first place in Australia to view the touring exhibition from the Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences (Powerhouse) in Sydney.

Design Nation brings together outstanding examples of Australian ingenuity and innovation in a range of classic, everyday objects from Aussie households.

The exhibition casts a spotlight on Australia's rich manufacturing and design history from the mid-1960s to the late 1980s.

Director Judy Kean said although the museum had enjoyed connecting with the community through the 'History from Home programs' and digital exhibitions, it was also "very exciting to be opening our doors to the public again".

Dave and Will Jaeger from Banora Point viewing some of the classic objects featured in the Design Nation exhibition at Tweed Regional Museum Murwillumbah.
Dave and Will Jaeger from Banora Point viewing some of the classic objects featured in the Design Nation exhibition at Tweed Regional Museum Murwillumbah.

 

"Australian designers have invented countless everyday items that have changed our lifestyle overtime. When we look around our homes, many items were actually designed in Australia, including the Dolphin torch, the Staysharp knife and even the Esky, to name a few," she said.

In preparation for reopening, new measures have been put in place to ensure the museum is a safe place to visit, including a limit on visitor numbers.

Visitors are encouraged to book their free tickets online for a morning or afternoon session.

The museum has strict hygiene measures in place and will continue to be guided by public health advice.

The museum's branch at Tweed Heads will remain closed until September 15.

However, visitors can take virtual tour of both Boyds' Shed and the original Tweed Heads Courthouse, and look forward to September school holiday programs.

To book your free visit, or to preview one of the Museum's virtual tours, visit the museum website museum.tweed.nsw.gov.au/TheMuseum or contact trm@tweed.nsw.gov.au or 02 6670 2493.

 

6. Tackling homelessness in Tweed

A $1.5 MILLION assertive outreach program is reducing the numbers of those sleeping rough in Tweed Heads.

State Member for Tweed Geoff Provest said dozens of people had been assisted into safe and secure housing which was helping to turn the tide of homelessness in the region.

"Staff have been out on the streets, conducting more than 500 patrols since we expanded our homelessness outreach efforts to Tweed Heads in September last year," he said.

 

Tweed MP Geoff Provest has his temperature checked with a thermometer.
Tweed MP Geoff Provest has his temperature checked with a thermometer.

"More than 45 people previously sleeping rough in our region have been helped into safe and secure housing through this program, and are now being provided the critical support they need to break the cycle of homelessness."

The program includes not only accommodation by rapidly securing them homes from the private rental market but 'wraparound support' rough sleepers need to they need to stay off the streets for good.

Mr Provest said the assertive outreach has also been a key component of the response to the COVID-19 pandemic in Tweed, with housing and homelessness services ramping up the effort to keep people safe during this very challenging time.

The NSW Government has allocated the Tweed AO team with a touchless thermometer to help with social distancing.

 

7. Are you eligible for extra childcare relief?

PCYC Out of School Hours services continued throughout the COVID-19 shutdowns, applying the Federal Government's childcare relief package, which ends on July 12.

PCYC State Manager Children Services, Karen Gibson, said PCYC, including the Tweed Heads facility, has been awarded a number of grants and transitional funding from the government, which means many families may be eligible for extra childcare relief.

"We understand that parents and children have had an unsettling year and that financial situations may have changed due to the shutdowns," Ms Gibson said.

"This additional funding, which is administered through Centre Link, will mean some families could have their Child Care Subsidy (CCS) calculated at a different rate resulting in lower out of pocket payments.

"This could reduce Vacation Care payments to as little as $5 a day for eligible families."

"We are very happy to have secured this funding. We know it will be a great help to those families that have lost income because of the COVID-19 pandemic."

Ms Gibson said families who are considering booking their child into a PCYC NSW vacation care program should call the OOSH co-ordinator at their local PCYC NSW club to discuss just what financial help is available.

 

8. Council votes for hinged barrier across weir pool

TWEED Shire Council resolved earlier this month to progress with the concept design of a hinged barrier across Bray Park Weir to protect the Tweed District Water Supply from the risk of tidal inundation.

The solution was one identified by a community Project Reference Group, which had been working on the difficult problem of saltwater contamination of the weir pool since March 2018.

The Tweed District Water Supply is at risk of saltwater contamination due to an increased frequency and intensity of high tides overtopping the weir wall.

 

The Tweed District Water Supply is at risk of saltwater contamination due to an increased frequency and intensity of high tides overtopping the weir wall. The Bray Park Weir supplies raw water for the Tweed.
The Tweed District Water Supply is at risk of saltwater contamination due to an increased frequency and intensity of high tides overtopping the weir wall. The Bray Park Weir supplies raw water for the Tweed.

The risk is heightened during times of low flow in the Tweed River which are insufficient to hold back an upcoming tide.

The risk is becoming more intense due to an increasing frequency of sea level anomalies, where actual tide heights exceed predicted tide heights.

In August 2017, the first of these sea level anomaly events resulted in a lot of saltwater getting into the weir pool, stopping the production of drinking water supplies for two days. The weir pool had to be dredged of the saltwater, at a cost of more than $400,000.

Since then, the council has prevented 26 overtoppings by manually placing heavy concrete blocks on the weir wall.

However, in the early hours of Monday 25 May this year, about 15 million litres of saltwater entered the weir pool on a higher-than-predicted tide.

By the time the council's staff realised the tide was significantly higher than predicted, it was too late and too dangerous for staff to deploy the concrete blocks.

That saltwater remains at the bottom of a deep water hole within the weir pool and has not affected the production of the Tweed's drinking water.

Water and Wastewater Business and Assets manager Anthony Burnham said the council had been managing the risk of tidal inundation of the weir pool for many years.

"First by placing sandbags across the weir wall and now by placing large concrete blocks on the wall, so we welcome the council's decision to progress with the concept design of a hinged barrier," he said.

Once a concept design is developed, cost estimates will be updated and this will be provided to the council to gain approval to proceed.

 

9. Memorial plaques for local RSL

TWO new plaques will be installed along Kingscliff Memorial Walkway by the Kingscliff RSL thanks to a $2,021 federal funding grant.

There are 28 commemorative plaques along the Memorial Walk on Murphy's Rd which is dedicated to military personnel who served in the First World War.

"Saluting Their Service grants aim to honour the service and sacrifice of Australia's service men and women in wars, conflicts and peace operations, and to promote appreciation and understanding of the role that those who served have played in shaping the nation," Federal Member for Richmond Justine Elliot said.

"Australia's veteran community deserves to have the best support available and I congratulate Kingscliff RSL Sub-Branch for the important work they do to honour and preserve our wartime heritage.

"I applaud the Kingscliff RSL, and their President Mr Brian Vickery, for constantly reminding us of our history and the importance of the plaques. The RSL have done an outstanding job in maintaining the momentum by continually approaching schools, seeking interest in future plaques and seeking sponsors.

"Well done Kingscliff RSL, like all service men and women you have undertaken this task with great dedication, and I thank you for your great work."

 

10. Arts trail rescheduled

ORGANISERS of the Murwillumbah Arts Trail have decided to postpone the event until May 2021 because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The annual celebration of art was scheduled to take place from May 1 to May 3 and has now been rescheduled to take place from May 28 to May 30 next year.

 

Talulah Rae, Nikki Shipard and Arna Boartz get ready for the Murwillumbah Arts Trail in previous years.
Talulah Rae, Nikki Shipard and Arna Boartz get ready for the Murwillumbah Arts Trail in previous years.

In an email, the committee said the decision was made with consideration for the health and safety of artists, participants and performers, volunteers and the public.

All the artists who have entered MAT20 will retain their places in the rescheduled event with more information to be available regarding the new format soon.



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