Tweed Shire Council's natural resources manager Tracey Stinson outside the Stotts Island tip.
Tweed Shire Council's natural resources manager Tracey Stinson outside the Stotts Island tip. Scott Powick Daily News

'100 years of waste': quarry extends landfill's life

TWEED Shire Council says it has the ability to manage "100 years” worth of waste following the development approval to use the excavated Quirks Quarry as landfill.

The claim comes after the decision to move the current animal pound to a site on Eviron Rd, causing angst among nearby residents who are upset about the potential noise of barking dogs.

At its August 2 meeting, council general manager Troy Green said there was no time to stall moving the pound to its new location.

"We have to rehouse the existing pound (at Stotts Creek) within the next year,” he said.

"We have a master plan for our waste site and where the pound is we have to move it.”

The urgency of the decision led to speculation the current landfill site was nearing capacity, however council waste management co-ordinator Rod Dawson said it was almost "impossible” to overfill the site due to EPA regulations.

He said the development approval to use the quarry site would only be used if "absolutely necessary”.

"In a best-case scenario we would never have to activate that approval,” he said.

"But we have 40 to 50 years' capacity for waste in that quarry, even beyond that we have another un-mined quarry which would allow a total of 100 years of landfill.”

PLENTY OF ROOM: Tweed Shire Council says it can manage 100 years of waste following approval to use Quirks Quarry for landfill.
PLENTY OF ROOM: Tweed Shire Council says it can manage 100 years of waste following approval to use Quirks Quarry for landfill. Scott Powick Daily News

Mr Dawson said there was at least 10 years left of landfill capacity at the current site for dry waste, with a further seven available for wet waste.

Council community and natural resources director Tracey Stinson said the Tweed's waste management was in a good position.

"Council made the sensible and forward- thinking decision to introduce green bins so we're taking so much more of that out of the landfill stream and turning it into compost,” she said.

"We should be thanking the Tweed community because they've done an amazing job, the State Government has given a target of 70 per cent diversion, because we introduced the green bins we're already at 62 per cent and we were already at 42 per cent before that.

"The urban community has done a fantastic job of really getting on board and putting all their kitchen scraps in all the green bins. We're really trying to engage and educate the community to take better responsibility for diversion and reduce the need for landfill long term.”



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