Council to halt myna's migration

THE Indian myna bird is renowned as one of the world’s worst pests, and more are coming to the Tweed each day.

The mynas, which have flooded the Tweed and surrounding areas since 2000 as they move south in search of new habitat, are recognised by the World Conservation Union as one of the top 100 most invasive species globally.

It is one of the few species of bird on the list, sitting beside the likes of cane toads and feral pigs.

Unlike an Australian relative, the noisy miner, the Indian myna competes for food and shelter with other birds and small mammals, particularly natives, and can have a staggering 18 chicks a year.

The birds are such a problem that Griffith University’s Environmental Future Centre has taken an interest in them and is keen for locals to report sightings.

Researcher Gail Spina told the Tweed Shire Council, “We’re very keen to find out as much as we can in [the] early emerging population stage ... so we can keep the numbers down.”

Tweed Shire Council is leading the way with a trapping program to control the numbers, with all birds caught being euthanised by local vets.

To date well over 1000 mynas have been removed from the population by the trapping program.

Residents are being urged to keep an eye out for the birds and report frequent sightings.

If you see mynas in your area, contact the Tweed Shire Council on (02) 6670 2778 (Wednesday to Friday) or email them at indianmyna@tweed.nsw.gov.au. Alternatively you can contact Gail Spina via email – gail.spina@griffith.edu.au.



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