Game store manager Katy McCormack wants R18+ ratings for games.
Game store manager Katy McCormack wants R18+ ratings for games. Blainey Woodham

Adult games not for kids

TWEED City gaming specialty store Game has led a petition to introduce R18+ ratings for adult games and is quickly gaining support.

Co-ordinating with PAL Gaming Network, Game stores across the country have gathered 89,210 signatures as part of the EveryonePlays campaign.

The Tweed City store gathered 492 signatures in just eight weeks – one of the highest petition counts across regional NSW.

Store manager Katy McCormack said R18+ ratings for PC and video games would give parents a better idea of what they were buying their children.

“Most games are MA15+ but there’s such a broad content within the rating that mums and dads don’t really know what they’re getting,” Ms McCormack said.

“Some people bring games back because it’s not what they thought it would be.

“A lot of parents are concerned about war games which can be very violent and realistic.”

PAL Gaming Network director Roland Kulen believed the absence of an R18+ games classification created a grey area for parents.

“There are no guidelines for parents, grandparents, or even Santa, so there will be some mistakes made and some younger teenagers will be given games that really are only suitable for adults,” Mr Kulen said.

“Australia is the only country in the developed world with an R18+ gaming classification and this literally means that some games given an R18+ rating in other countries can be given an MA15+ rating here in Australia.”

The petition has been presented to Home Affairs Minister Brendan O’Conner.



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