Peter, Connie and Jeanette Sue Tin looking forward to Australia Day.
Peter, Connie and Jeanette Sue Tin looking forward to Australia Day. Kirstin Payne

After years of tragedy woman is set to become an Aussie

AFTER years of tragedy Jeanette Sue Tin will finally call Australia home, becoming one of Australia's newest citizens this coming Sunday.

Postponed since 2009, Mrs Sue Tin's ceremony was long overdue.

"At six weeks old my daughter Connie was diagnosed with Retinoblastoma resulting in the removal of one of her eyes," Mrs Sue Tin said.

"The year after my husband suffered from a back injury so I was still not able to attempt my test."

The Sue Tin family's bout of disaster continued with their house being inundated by three floods in the two years following.

However despite all this Jeanette still counts herself as one of Warwick's luckiest immigrants.

"I am so grateful to finally become an Australian, everyone is so open here," she said.

Coached by her husband Peter and his friend Blue Bostock, both of whom she met in Papua New Guinea, Jeanette is well versed on what it means to be Australian.

"G'day was the first real Aussie word I knew but I learnt early what it meant to be true blue, every time we land back in Australia I kiss the ground, I love it here so much."

Having studied every year for the citizenship test, Mrs Sue Tin still found it difficult.

However the hardest citizenship test of all came once she shared her successful results with her neighbours.

"After I told them the good news they lined up three beers on the table and told me to drink; I could only finish one so I still have a bit to go," Mrs Sue Tin said.

This ceremony will be all the more special for the Sue Tin family as Peter's great great grandfather was the first Queensland citizen with Chinese heritage to be recognised.

"I think many immigrants miss out and don't embrace this country as much as they should," Mr Sue Tin said.

"You can't leave your head in the homeland if your feet are planted here."



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