Tweed intensive care paramedic Michael Smith, Australian College of Ambulance Professionals chairman Carpet Hughes and Ambulance NSW acting chief executive Dr Mike Willis.
Tweed intensive care paramedic Michael Smith, Australian College of Ambulance Professionals chairman Carpet Hughes and Ambulance NSW acting chief executive Dr Mike Willis. Craig Sadler

Ambos embrace change

GUNSHOT wounds and in-transit ultrasounds were on the agenda in Tweed yesterday.

The topics were discussed by some of the country’s best paramedics and doctors at an Australian College of Ambulance Professionals conference.

Tweed Heads intensive care paramedic and college director Michael Smith organised the Trauma on the Border conference.

“A lot of the guys up here don’t get the chance to attend the national conference in Sydney,” Mr Smith said.

“It’s important to keep up to date with all the clinical changes.”

College chairman Carpet Hughes said more than 130 people attended the event at Twin Towns Services Club, including university students, doctors and paramedics from around the country.

“Our keynote speaker was Dr Crozier, a trauma surgeon from Liverpool hospital who specialises in ballistic trauma injuries such as gunshots and explosions,” he said.

“Dr Mike Willis, acting CEO of Ambulance Service of NSW, also spoke.

“The community probably don’t realise how qualified paramedics are these days. Intensive care paramedics are as good, sometimes better, than doctors.”

Mr Hughes thanked the event’s major sponsor, Hendersen Matusch, and Twin Towns Services Club.



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