Banora traffic plan released

By ROXANNE MILLAR

IT is the Tweed's highway link of the future - a 2.5-kilometre stretch of road that shows just how much the Tweed is expected to grow over the next 20 years.

Options for the upgrade of Sexton Hill were unveiled yesterday after 12 months of intensive planning with numerous community groups and stakeholders.

Two options were put forth by planners at the Roads and Traffic Authority, both featuring a six-lane highway to cut through the Banora Point gully area with separate roads to funnel local traffic from suburb to suburb.

Tweed MP Neville Newell said both options would provide major relief to regular traffic congestion on the hill and cut down on car accidents.

"These options provide the means to move traffic around much more smoothly, with the feature that local traffic will not be in conflict with highway traffic," he said.

"The extra traffic on that stretch of road is a result of growth, particularly to the west and the highway will help to manage that."

Option A provides a highway close to the existing alignment, except with a viaduct over the valley area.

It proposes a cutting on the peak of Sexton Hill 16 metres below the current highway and the replacement of the new pedestrian bridge.

It also features a new local road from Darlington Drive to Laura Street, crossing back over the highway and south to Terranora Road.

Option B pushes further east than Option A and features a land bridge over 100 metres of the highway.

The RTA is expected to make a decision between both of the options after community consultation ends on May 21.

Tweed residents and road users are urged to view the plans and make submissions on them before that date by attending the project display centre at 62 Pacific Highway, Banora Point or at Tweed City or the Banora Shopping Village.

Meanwhile, brochures containing both route maps will be distributed to letterboxes in Banora Point, South Tweed, Fingal and Terranora areas.

Mr Newell said he anticipated a decision on the route would be made some time around October, but could not estimate when the project might begin construction.

Several houses are expected to be resumed under the plans, but have already been bought by the NSW government with this intention in mind. Other homes along the potential routes are already being treated for a potential noise increase, Mr Newell said.



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