REPRIEVE FOR A BEAUTY: A recommendation of council?s water sustainability committee to retain Tally Dam and negotiate to purcha
REPRIEVE FOR A BEAUTY: A recommendation of council?s water sustainability committee to retain Tally Dam and negotiate to purcha

Council agrees to revamp Tally Dam



By YVONNE McLEAN

THE Tallebudgera Creek Dam, constructed in the 1950s and long since forgotten as one of the southern Gold Coast's water supply reservoirs, seems almost certain to be preserved and rehabilitated.

After extensive community consultations and strong backing for the dam's survival from rural fire brigades, the Queensland Fire and Rescue Service (Air Operations) and no doubt the many water birds that call it home, council is moving along the pathway to retain the dam.

A recommendation of the water sustainability committee to retain the dam and negotiate to purchase the privately-owned land on which the lakes, embankments, spillways and access are located, was unanimously approved by Council last week.

For the area councillor, Christine Robbins, saving the dam has a deep significance.

Retaining the Tally Dam and upgrading it, making it safe, was one of the wishes of her late sister-in-law and former councillor Sue Robbins.

"I think we'll see Sue's wish fulfilled ? all the good aspects of the dam retained along with a good water supply for bushfire emergencies," Cr Robbins said.

There were two alternatives open to council ? upgrade the dam or demolish it. During group sessions with affected residents, an emotional attachment to the dam was revealed along with its contribution to community safety, such as available water for fire fighting.

The community also acknowledges the role the waterway played as a habitat for birds; and the land around it nurtured other fauna.

The council committee's re- port stated community members believed the environment could never be returned to what it was before the dam was built due to development in the valley and the fact that the old ecosystem no longer existed.

The Tallebudgera Rural Fire Brigade emphasises that the demolition of the local dam with its expanse of water (always at good capacity) would be a serious loss of an asset for aerial fire fighting.

The dam's location would enable helicopters to cover up to five kilometres of area including Tallebudgera, Upper Currumbin, Springbrook and Tomewin.

Retaining the dam will require a big program to ensure it conforms to safety conditions, and negotiations by council to buy the privatelyowned land on which the dam and surrounds is located could take time.By YVONNE McLEAN

THE Tallebudgera Creek Dam, constructed in the 1950s and long since forgotten as one of the southern Gold Coast's water supply reservoirs, seems almost certain to be preserved and rehabilitated.

After extensive community consultations and strong backing for the dam's survival from rural fire brigades, the Queensland Fire and Rescue Service (Air Operations) and no doubt the many water birds that call it home, council is moving along the pathway to retain the dam.

A recommendation of the water sustainability committee to retain the dam and negotiate to purchase the privately-owned land on which the lakes, embankments, spillways and access are located, was unanimously approved by Council last week.

For the area councillor, Christine Robbins, saving the dam has a deep significance.

Retaining the Tally Dam and upgrading it, making it safe, was one of the wishes of her late sister-in-law and former councillor Sue Robbins.

"I think we'll see Sue's wish fulfilled ? all the good aspects of the dam retained along with a good water supply for bushfire emergencies," Cr Robbins said.

There were two alternatives open to council ? upgrade the dam or demolish it. During group sessions with affected residents, an emotional attachment to the dam was revealed along with its contribution to community safety, such as available water for fire fighting.

The community also acknowledges the role the waterway played as a habitat for birds; and the land around it nurtured other fauna.

The council committee's re- port stated community members believed the environment could never be returned to what it was before the dam was built due to development in the valley and the fact that the old ecosystem no longer existed.

The Tallebudgera Rural Fire Brigade emphasises that the demolition of the local dam with its expanse of water (always at good capacity) would be a serious loss of an asset for aerial fire fighting.

The dam's location would enable helicopters to cover up to five kilometres of area including Tallebudgera, Upper Currumbin, Springbrook and Tomewin.

Retaining the dam will require a big program to ensure it conforms to safety conditions, and negotiations by council to buy the privatelyowned land on which the dam and surrounds is located could take time.



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