The border monument acts as a reminder of the different time zones that divide the Twin Towns in daylight saving.
The border monument acts as a reminder of the different time zones that divide the Twin Towns in daylight saving.

Daylight debate rages, again

By JADE BILOWOL

IT is time to wind the clock forward an hour.

This is the Liberals' call to prompt the Queensland Government to switch south-east Queensland to daylight saving for a two-year trial.

Liberal leader and Robina MP Bob Quinn has labelled the trial a solution to the economic and social disadvantages the Gold Coast experiences for being behind the time of other states on the eastern seaboard.

"Failure to switch to daylight saving is costing Queensland companies millions of dollars each year," Mr Quinn said.

"For five months of the year, Queensland is out of sync with other eastern seaboard states and there's no doubt it is costing Queensland economically, particularly in relation to finance, entertainment and tourism industries."

Mr Quinn also said the south-east corner was being deprived of "the obvious lifestyle benefits" daylight saving offered.

In 1992, a daylight saving referendum was narrowly defeated in Queensland, but a staggering 60.4 per cent of south-east Queensland residents voted in favour.

"The weird and wacky reasons for rejecting daylight saving such as confused cows and faded curtains are long gone," Mr Quinn said.

"It's now time Queensland joined the rest of Australia and the Beattie Government lived up to its mantra of the Smart State."

A review by an independent assessment panel would follow the trial.

Mr Beattie has repeatedly refused to re-examine the issue of re-introducing daylight saving in Queensland.

Mudgeeraba MP Dianne Reilly said she backed Mr Beattie's stance on daylight saving because confusion would arise with two time zones in the one state.

"This leaves me to think that the Liberal Party think daylight saving is not the best thing for the state," Ms Reilly said.

"It is difficult with two time zones on the border but shifting the problem of managing the time zones on the border into the state is practically beyond any reasoning.

"You have to do what is best for the state and having two time zones is not beneficial to the community or businesses - it just shifts the problem."

Ms Reilly said residents had not lobbied her about the issue and she could therefore not see demand for daylight saving.

"If the community wants to correct me I am more than happy to hear from them," she said.

"The phones aren't ringing hot about daylight saving and it doesn't stop people coming to the Gold Coast and doing business."



GALLERY: Tweed River High School students shine

GALLERY: Tweed River High School students shine

Watch out for our special formals insert on December 1

Mayor's plea for Tweed

Mayor's plea for Tweed

Mayoral message from Cr Katie Milne

Why not do a long lunch on Sunday?

Why not do a long lunch on Sunday?

Fins at Plantation House is open for Sunday lunch

Local Partners