Residents converge at the dangerous dogleg
Residents converge at the dangerous dogleg

Death watch

By JADE BILOWOL

FRUSTRATED Miami and Nobby Beach residents fear only death will motivate the Gold Coast City Council to improve a dangerous traffic hazard. Yet another frightening smash - that claimed four cars last month - at the dogleg connecting Marine Parade at Miami and Albatross Avenue at Nobby Beach has proven the last straw for nearby residents. With years of complaints directed to the council falling on deaf ears, disgruntled residents last week took area councillor Eddy Sarroff to task with a protest at the notorious site. Mike Golden, an Albatross Avenue resident of eight years who is spearheading the protest movement, presented Cr Sarroff with a petition of 50 signatures demanding slowing devices be positioned to the north and south of the dogleg to slow speeding motorists along the 40km zone stretch. "The council hasn't listened to us and has not wanted to do anything - what will it take?" Mr Golden asked. "They have constantly fobbed us off by saying it is a police matter." It is alleged a northbound Toyota 4WD collided with three parked cars lining Albatross Avenue on the dogleg early March to produce a damage bill in excess of $10,000. Mr Golden said the incident was preceded by a northbound Commodore allegedly speeding through the dogleg and careering through the front yard of 10 Albatross Avenue. The wayward vehicle allegedly collided with the resident's car in the driveway before ploughing through a fence into 12 Albatross Avenue. "Day and night certain motorists - particularly those driving hotted-up cars - speed through the dogleg because nothing is preventing it," Mr Golden said. "Traffic police focus on high volume locations so we hope the council doesn't again claim this issue is a police matter." Cr Sarroff told the protesters he would put concerns to traffic engineers who would inspect the site to determine if improvements were required. Rita Ventura, who has owned a unit right on the dogleg for 30 years, said the worst accident she had witnessed was a vehicle smashing into her unit building. Ms Ventura said she also froze every time she saw young families use a crossing at the dogleg. "They have to cross to get to the beach - it's practically the entry way to Nobby Beach - and it's extremely dangerous because someone speeding could quickly collect a child," she said.



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