DR Michael Lindley-Jones with his two children Jessica, 11, and George, 10.  Photo: JOHN HOULDSWORTH D100884b
DR Michael Lindley-Jones with his two children Jessica, 11, and George, 10. Photo: JOHN HOULDSWORTH D100884b

Doctor on the spot

By SAMANTHA HEALY

TWEED doctor Michael Lindley-Jones was the right person in the right place at the right time late Tuesday afternoon.

Driving to the Pines Shopping Centre at Elanora with his two children, The Tweed Hospital intensive care specialist came across a critically injured 14-year-old boy.

The high school student had apparently slipped on the roadside in Guineas Creek Rd and been hit by a passing car.

Dr Lindley-Jones immediately swung into action reviving the boy who had severe head injuries and was bleeding profusely.

"I was lucky to come across the accident so soon after it happened," he said. "At the time the patient was unconscious.

"I just used simple measures that can make quite a difference.

"I normally do this in a hospital ward, not in the mud beside the road. It would be routine for paramedics."

Yesterday Dr Lindley-Jones stressed the importance of basic first-aid training.

"Everyone should learn CPR and basic first aid," he said. "You may only use it once or twice, but it may save someone's life."

Last night the injured teenager remained in a critical condition in Gold Coast Hospital.

Dr Lindley-Jones said the incident brought home how simple the measures used were.

"I was just an off-duty doctor who was passing by," he said.

Dr Lindley-Jones' children Jessica, 11, and George, 10, in the car at the time, were both impressed by their father's actions.

"It was very scary," Jessica Lindley-Jones, 11, said.

Ambulance crew arrived within ten minutes, but Dr Lindley-Jones said the public could play a vital role in saving a life.

"Ten minutes can make all the difference to someone's survivability," he said.

"There is a chain of survival.

"If the first link is broken, that person may not survive."

Understanding of the fears the public may have, Dr Lindley-Jones said if you have proper resuscitation training the best thing to do is help.

"Use your courage of convictions and overcome these hurdles,'' Dr Lindley-Jones said.

"If you have the skill and something happens you could save someone's life."



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