KINGSCLIFF Dune Care?s Peter Langley with his grandson Jack Nosworthy in front of a sign aimed at shaming tree vandals. D95878B
KINGSCLIFF Dune Care?s Peter Langley with his grandson Jack Nosworthy in front of a sign aimed at shaming tree vandals. D95878B

Dune carers give notice to vandals

By PETER CATON

COASTAL residents who poison trees to gain better views of the ocean beware.

The fight against you is gathering strength.

Tweed dune care groups are preparing to ask Tweed Shire Council to introduce a policy that would immediately shame tree killers and destroy their views.

Kingscliff Dune Car co-ordinator Peter Langley said that under the policy being sought, a sign advising of the vandalism and blocking the newly created views would be erected "automatically" once council staff established that trees had been poisoned.

His comments follow the recent erection by the NSW Department of Lands of just such a sign, given recent council approval, near Marine Parade.

"A number of people along Marine Parade have been killing trees or chopping them down over 20 years so as to get a better view of the sea," Mr Langley said.

"In the most recent case they drilled little holes near the roots and filled them with poison. They had a go at about 60 trees. About 15 died."

Mr Langely said an approach by the council's dune care advisory committee to now-sacked councillors in May for a sign to be erected blocking the newlycreated views and shaming the vandals was initially rejected.

However the council did approve the sign in its "dying days" after a second request.

"We want a process where whenever this happens the signs go straight up," he said, adding that new trees should also be quickly planted.

"In some councils in Sydney as soon as a tree is removed they go and put two trees in.

"That's what we want this council to do, because this is happening right across the shire wherever there are views."



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