Heard the one about a sick calf?

By HUGH KEARNEY

MIDDAY shoppers in Murwillumbah yesterday were more than a little surprised to see a newborn calf riding in a baby stroller along Queen Street.

Was this a straggler from the Banana Festival or a promotional stunt for the upcoming show?

Neither, as it turned out.

The red-and-white baby cow was on its way to the vet in Queen Street for a bit of timely care and attention.

Daisy, a three-day-old Hereford, had been abandoned by its mother on a Piggabeen property because she already had a calf at foot.

The property owner found the calf in a creek, cold and lost, and with very little chance of survival.

But when neighbours Selina Carter and Corinne Archer heard about the calf's plight they offered to take care of the little bovine.

"We have all sorts on our place - sheep, chooks, ducks - but this is our first cow," Selina said.

"We couldn't bear to see it just die so we adopted it.

"We are both registered nurses, and we are doing a bit of self-diagnosis here, but we think it has a touch of pneumonia after ending up in the creek," Selina said.

"So we are taking it along to the vet for a jab, but the poor little thing is very weak and already a bit heavy to carry, so we thought the easiest way to transport it was in the baby's stroller."

Despite some funny looks from passers-by at the stroller and its unusual passenger, Daisy and her handlers made it safely to the vet's surgery, and at last report it was doing fine.



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