BANORA Point doctor Austin Sterne uses the new skin lesion analysis system, which the CSIRO helped to develop. Photo: KAREN HAR
BANORA Point doctor Austin Sterne uses the new skin lesion analysis system, which the CSIRO helped to develop. Photo: KAREN HAR

Hi-tech scan catches skin cancer early



CUTTING edge technology could be about to increase the pick-up rate of skin cancers on the Tweed, while reducing the number of fatal melanomas.

A new skin cancer clinic in South Tweed has got its hands on a CSIRO-developed skin lesion analysis system, which uses camera technology to photograph skin lesions for computer analysis.

General practitioner with special interests in skin cancer Austin Sterne said the program gave doctors a percentage rate of the chance of the lesion being a melanoma.

"It gives GPs the same pick-up rate as world experts in dermatology," he said.

"It also gives doctors an instant second opinion and the chance for us to compare lesions from month to month for changes if we are unsure."

In the Tweed it is a valuable addition to skin cancer services, which are in high demand by the local elderly population.

"This is the sun cancer capital of the world, much more so than in Europe where I have worked," Dr Sterne said.

"Girls in their 30s are having nasties removed."

The new skin lesion system is available at the Banora Skin Cancer Clinic.



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