THE spinner tosses the coins at the Twin Towns Services Club Anzac Day two-up school yesterday
THE spinner tosses the coins at the Twin Towns Services Club Anzac Day two-up school yesterday

How to play two-up



"Ten a head. I'll take ten a head."

Someone close by in the crowd accepts the bet and a note changes hand.

"Come in spinner!"

The coins are flipped into the air and the crowd watches expectantly.

As the coins land a cheer goes up from the tightly-packed crowd.

"You beauty!"

Regardless of the result of the toss there is always a winner at two-up.

The scene yesterday at the Twin Towns Services Club Anzac Day two-up school would have been repeated at numerous venues around the nation.

About 300 people crowded around the ring to have a go at the game linked so strongly to the Anzac legend.

Sydney visitors and self-confessed two-up addicts, Brett Olliffe and Tony McMahon were right amongst the action, enjoying the day of fun and mateship in a new venue.

(The Twinnies two-up school was a bit bigger than the one they played last year with just six others at Dunedoo.)

"It is a fair dinkum Aussie game, all fair and square," Brett said.

"In here, everyone's equal - men and women, coppers and crooks, labourers and judges.

"It's a fifty-fifty bet every time," he said.

Come in spinner

SPINNER: The punter who is chosen to toss the coins. The spinner keeps tossing while ever they toss heads, but as soon as they a tail, they're off and a new spinner comes to the centre.

GET SET: Have a bet with another punter. All bets are even money bets, 50/50. Tails traditionally holds the bet until the toss is decided.

THE KIP: A short, flat, wooden spade like a cooking spoon upon which the coins are placed for the toss, so the spinner can't manipulate the toss. Three coins, traditionally pennies, are used in the toss to make sure there is a result every throw, ie either two heads or two tails. The coins have a white cross on the tails side for easy identification. On the kip, the coins are placed with two tails and one head showing.



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