DUDLEY St George and wife Alice, looking forward to at last enjoying their Seaside City property.
DUDLEY St George and wife Alice, looking forward to at last enjoying their Seaside City property.

Long wait to develop

By PETER CATON

"SO happy"? that's the reaction of a retired sandmining engineer to the possibility that a block of land he bought over 40 years ago may finally be built on.

Dudley St George, 83, who worked with sandmining companies south of Kingscliff in the 1960s is among several dozen small landholders who will benefit from development of the Seaside City subdivision.

Tweed Shire Council's administrators are today expected to give the final go-ahead for development of the 204-lot subdivision created in 1927.

Combined with recent NSW Government rezoning of the land from tourist use only to tourism and residential, the move means land owners ? some who inherited their sites ? will finally be allowed to build.

Council planners have recommended the administrators adopt a development control plan for the subdivision which lies between Salt and Casuarina Beach.

They have also recommended the administrators give the nod to a development application from the major landowner Richtech Pty Ltd for the construction of roads and a cycleway, laying water and sewer mains and creating parkland.

Mr St George bought his beachfront block near Salt in 1963 and later lodged plans for a home he was never given permission to build.

"It must be 25 years since I put in the application to build along with a set of building plans," he said.

Mr St George and his wife have since moved to Wagga Wagga which he said was more convenient for them in many ways but had never matched the lifestyle of the Tweed.

"The happiest time of our lives was up in the Tweed," he said. "We never had to have a fan on or a fire going. It was wonderful."

Richtech director Bruce Barclay said his company had been working hard to get final development approval.

The development control plan limits beachfront buildings to two-storey despite hopes of some landowners that an older three-storey limit would be maintained.

It also makes provision for some beachfront landholders to swap four metres of land affected by a potential erosion zone with the same amount of land in a formerly proposed street.



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