HUMID conditions one minute, wet weather the next ? it?s enough to totally confuse anyone, so Bianca Wise decided to make sure
HUMID conditions one minute, wet weather the next ? it?s enough to totally confuse anyone, so Bianca Wise decided to make sure

MORE RAIN ON WAY

By NADINE FISHER

PREPARE to carry a brolly with you for the next few months.

That's the word from the NSW Bureau of Meteorology who tips that we may be in for plenty more rain up until March.

Yesterday Bureau weather services manager Rob Webb said the climatic forecast for the Tweed region was a 60 per cent chance of exceeding the average rainfall between January and March.

"Beyond that, conditions look to be remaining fairly neutral, but some heavy rain is not out of the question," he said.

"February and March are what are considered to be the wettest and most humid times of the year for the area."

Ironically, Mr Webb's predictions for heavy rains around February and March coincide with the 50th anniversary of the 1956 flood which occurred on February 19.

Charting rainfall patterns over the years may help to determine whether the Tweed will be spared another drenching.

For one such weather follower, monitoring the rainfall has been a lifelong interest.

Tweed Heads resident Wal Smith, a retired geography teacher and former principal of Tweed River High School, started measuring rainfall in Tamworth during his high school years and reported rainfall for Tamworth's Northern Daily Leader newspaper.

"I've always been interested in the weather and how it affects our lives ? what clothes you should wear, if you can play golf or bowls or whether you need to stay indoors," he said.

"On Monday night we had 75 millimetres in half-an-hour and all up we've had over 100 millimetres."

Mr Smith said in 2005 the Tweed area had 1742 millimetres rainfall which was pretty average compared to the last three years.

He said in 2004 Tweed had 1640 millimetres and in 2003, 1720 millimetres rainfall.

"The last three years have been pretty average but that doesn't mean it was evenly spread," he said.

For the lower Tweed, much of this year's rain came in heavy downpours at the end of June, causing flash flooding around Banora Waters and Tweed Heads South as well as isolated areas of the Tweed Coast such as Cabarita.



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