MP May on the pros and cons of politics

By NADINE FISHER

DETERMINATION to make a difference for Australians through politics is what drives McPherson MP Margaret May. After years of working in third world developing countries, Mrs May said she learnt just how important democracy is. "Democracy and freedom of choice, freedom to vote, speak, and live with an accountable government are so important," she said. "In countries like Indonesia (where Mrs May and her husband and three children spent four years working), where you see poverty, disease, no social security, no healthcare providers, you understand how important democracy and a transparent and accountable government are." Mrs May said being aware of these issues gave her a broader understanding of social issues. "Australia, as a developed country, has a responsibility to share our resources and knowledge. It's to our advantage to ensure these countries in the Asia-Pacific continue to have a stable government and we have peace in the region," she said. "And I'm very excited to be campaigning for another Federal election in Australia." Mrs May, who was first elected as McPherson MP in 1998, previously worked in the NSW State Education Department. A Currumbin resident, she said the McPherson electorate would speak on election day. "I have delivered some big ticket items during my term including the Tugun Bypass commitment of $120 million from the Federal Government, beds for four new nursing homes, committing to the new school at Varsity Lakes, the new Elanora Medicare office, small equipment grants to community groups and support of small business," she said. "Another area opening up to me is the suicide rates of young people ? it impacts on so many in the community and we need help and assistance for these young people." Mrs May said after two terms in government she was still passionate about politics and being involved to give something back. "I know politicians don't rate very highly but when people meet me they see that I'm just an ordinary person like them with a family, a mortgage etc," she said. "Politics can be very frustrating, you don't always win, you often don't see a change in policy and it can be lonely as you spend half your life on the road. "The most rewarding part is working in your electorate." Mrs May said in this current campaign she would have a campaign van travelling throughout her electorate. "Residents will be notified when the campaign van will be visiting their area," she said.



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