MISCHIEF, a five-month-old black and tan silky terrier is helped to recuperate by Dr Stephanie Wright of the Murwillumbah Veter
MISCHIEF, a five-month-old black and tan silky terrier is helped to recuperate by Dr Stephanie Wright of the Murwillumbah Veter

Pets in danger from stings and bites



THE backyard is becoming an increasing deadly place for the family pet in the Tweed with warm and humid weather bringing out snakes, paralysis ticks and worsening the threat of heartworm. Vets yesterday warned about the dangers to animals from creatures that sting and bite.

Earlier this week health authorities and pest controllers warned the hot weather had created an excellent season for insects including dangerous red back spiders.

The Australian Veterinary Association yesterday warned the hot and humid weather had worsened the threat of heartworm which is spread by mosquitoes and is bringing out snakes.

Murwillumbah Veterinary Clinic's Dr Stephanie Wright this week treated the first case of a paralysis tick on a dog for January, but 12 were brought in last month, 25 in November and more than one a day in September and October.

"People often forget to use tick prevention after Christmas and most animals that come in with tick paralysis have no current form of prevention," she said.

Dr Wright said the clinic recommended paralysis tick collars for dogs and she believed they should be changed monthly.

Nothing however was more effective than checking the dog or cat morning and night.

An average of two animals a month are also being brought to the clinic suffering snake-bite.

The majority have been attacked by brown snakes, but culprits also include small-eyed snakes and Clarence River rough-scaled snakes. Unfortunately, said Dr Wright, "there may be many dead animals we don't see".

She warned people to keep grass short in their backyards and restrict where their dogs go.

"Overgrown backyards in Murwillumbah get brown snakes in them just the same as the country."



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