Shire chiefs take leave

TWEED Shire Council's two administrators are planning two sets of long breaks within two months of each other as they decide how often to meet next year. The double holiday plans yesterday sparked outrage, partly because the administrators Garry Payne and Max Boyd face a short year in any case with a long-awaited council election due in September. A proposed timetable for council meetings would give them a five-week break over Christmas before coming back in the new year for just two meetings, each three weeks apart. They would then take another four-week break in February and March before returning for just nine more meetings, each three weeks apart before they are replaced by elected councillors in September. The reason for the second holiday in February and March remains a mystery with a council spokesperson yesterday telling the Daily News she was "really busy" and unable to provide a response. The administrators have previously come under fire for reducing meeting dates after they cut the fortnightly schedule of the former elected council back to meetings%every three weeks. The latest timetable, which is expected to be rubber-stamped at next Tuesday's council meeting, was yesterday slammed by council watchers from both sides of the political fence former mayor Warren Polglase and his long-time critic Jerry Cornford from the lobby group Tweed Monitor. "It's a total shemozzle," said Mr Polglase. "Once again Tweed is left just flying in the breeze. They have lost%total direction; there is no control. "I've heard that from many people. I had a bloke tell me he wanted to address a community access session and he couldn't get in. The administrators just don't care." Mr Cornford said a range of%issues need to be dealt with before a new council is elected in September and he had expected that would%require more meetings. He said the issues included policies on building height limits across the shire, particularly Hastings Point, and development control plans for coastal villages which should be put in place before a revision of the council's main planning document, the Local Environment Plan, is considered. "There are also issues that come up and the community needs the%opportunity to voice views," he said.



What's on: Gig guide

What's on: Gig guide

Check out what's going on in the live music scene across the Tweed.

Check out this week's Tweed Link

Check out this week's Tweed Link

Find out what's on council's agenda

Labor promises to rollout protection plan for aged care

Labor promises to rollout protection plan for aged care

NSW Labor will establish an ombudsman service for aged care

Local Partners