The spot where a Chinderah youth went missing on Saturday.
The spot where a Chinderah youth went missing on Saturday.

Surf Tragedy

A CHINDERAH teenager lost in surf at Cabarita on Saturday afternoon was one of three lives claimed by treacherous conditions on Tweed and Gold Coast beaches over the weekend. The 15-year-old, whose name has not yet been released, was swimming with three friends about 30 metres south of Cabarita headland when he got into difficulties at about 3pm on Saturday. An extensive search by search and rescue volunteers and co-ordinated by police failed to recover the teenager's body by nightfall. The search was resumed at daybreak yesterday with seven jet skis, three inflatable dinghies and a coast guard vessel taking part. A police command post was established on the top of Norries Head at Cabarita. It is believed the teen was dumped by a wave and swept out around around the headland. n From Page 1 The Westpac Rescue helicopter was to have joined in the search yesterday morning but was diverted by Queensland water police to a drowning at the Southport Spit. Surf Queensland spokesman Kevin Dunn said the alarm was raised at 8.43am yesterday at an unpatrolled section of beach between the Seaworld Nara Resort and the pumping jetty where a middle-aged man went missing. The man's body was later recovered at 1.30pm by the helicopter crew. Queensland police said it was a particularly tragic incident because the man, believed to be aged 24 from Nimbin, had gone into the water to assist a 13-year-old girl and a 10-year-old boy, the man's sister and step-son who had got into difficulties. The children made it to shore but the man was carried away. A third life was lost on Saturday morning at Rainbow Bay when an elderly Runaway Bay man died while boogie-boarding. Mr Dunn said conditions were especially tricky along the length of the Gold Coast. He said a sand bank had formed about 50 metres off the beach along the coast. "The sand is very soft and the bank keeps collapsing," he said. "It has created deep gutters and fierce rips as the volume of water tries to escape back to sea. "The water is inviting but treacherous." Yesterday morning, lifeguards were constantly changing flag positions in a bid to find safe bathing spots. "When combined with low tide, water conditions can change very rapidly," he said.



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