MURWILLUMBAH High School students (from left) David Voisey, Whitney Eglington, Charlotte Lambert and Elisha Lee celebrate after
MURWILLUMBAH High School students (from left) David Voisey, Whitney Eglington, Charlotte Lambert and Elisha Lee celebrate after

Test releases pressure valve

By CHRISTIAN STANGER

IF Murwillumbah High students were anything to go by, the start of four gruelling weeks of HSC exams for Year 12 students across NSW was greeted mostly with relief yesterday.

Murwillumbah students were among the 66,000 across the state, including about 5000 on the northern coast, to begin a pressure-filled month of tests.

As is the tradition, all students sat their English exam first.

Murwillumbah school captain, Whitney Eglington, 17, said she was glad she studied as hard as she had.

"It was better than I expected although the essay question wasn't as nice as I would have liked. I'm glad I studied for the first part and read up on all the different techniques because it was much easier that way.

"I was very nervous going in. I wasn't nervous until I got to the school but once I stepped out of the car, the nerves set in. I've got six exams left and I finish at the end of the exams in November."

Co-captain, David Voisey, 18, said the exam was as expected.

"I didn't go too badly, the questions were fairly easy although very specific in most areas. It was fairly typical of an English exam where you are able to answer the questions without too much effort.

"I was actually fairly relaxed for the whole exam. I don't know why I was like that but I have done a lot of study lately and wasn't too worried about it.

"I have six exams left and I finish on November 9."

School vice-captain, Charlotte Lambert, 18, was feeling relieved that she had performed okay but confessed to the jitters.

"I was really nervous and scared but I'm feeling better now.

"I've got another english paper and then five more subjects before I finish on November 17."

Another student Elisha Lee, 18, also was glad to be done with the first exam after feeling stressed yesterday morning.

"Now the exam is all over, it's just a big relief and I feel a lot better. I think I almost went better in it than I did in the trials so that's really good.

"Once I started looking at the questions, it all became really fluent and I started thinking but when you're sitting there, it's a bit nerve racking."



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