WIND BACK CLOCK



CROSS-BORDER daylight saving problems will be over for another seven months from early tomorrow, when clocks in four states and the ACT officially move back an hour.

Queensland clocks will remain unchanged. As usual, Queenslanders stayed on Eastern Standard Time over the summer months.

Daylight saving was extended for one week for 2005-06 because of the Melbourne Commonwealth Games.

Currumbin MP Jan Stuckey, whose electorate has its south-ern boundary on the NSW/Qld border, yesterday accused Premier Peter Beattie of playing "wedge politics" by refusing to agree to a split time zone for Queensland's south-east corner.

She said families with parents working on either side of the border and children at schools with different curriculums were annoyed Queensland had been one hour behind the rest of Australia's east coast for the past five months.

Mrs Stuckey ? the Opposition's tourism, fair trading and wine industry spokeswoman ? said the south-east Queensland population had grown in the 12 years since Queenslanders last voted on daylight saving.

Clocks in NSW, Victoria, Tasmania, South Australia and the ACT will be turned back one hour at 3am tomorrow.

The end of daylight saving brings Sydney, Canberra, Melbourne and Hobart into line with Brisbane, but still 30 minutes ahead of Adelaide and Darwin and two hours ahead of Perth.

Daylight saving resumes on Sunday, October 29, 2006.



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