Queensland and NSW will work together to fight violence.
Queensland and NSW will work together to fight violence.

AVO victims and police get help in fight against violence

VICTIMS of violence are set to benefit from legislation that has passed through two state parliaments enabling police to provide increased protection.

Tweed MP Geoff Provest said the changes would mean apprehended violence orders were no longer restricted to the state in which they were issued with NSW and Queensland agreeing to a partnership that will see them enforceable across both states.

"There's two parts to it,” Mr Provest said.

"The first part is late this year the NSW Government passed legislation recognising Queensland AVOs and Queensland have responded and passed legislation in their parliament recognising the NSW one.

"So where before you had the issue where an AVO issued in NSW was not enforceable across the street in, say Coolangatta, and vice versa.

"We have now changed that and will recognise the Queensland one and they will recognise our one.”

Mr Provest said victims such as sufferers of domestic violence would be safer because of the change, while it will also make policing easier and criminals more accountable.

Mr Provest said the second boost to policing such matters would come into effect with the new NSW-Queensland cross-border MoU, which will allow government departments, such as social services, to share information more freely.

Tweed Byron LAC Superintendent Wayne Starling was yet to receive confirmation of the agreement but welcomed the proposal and said anything that reduced stress on victims was positive.

Tweed Byron LAC Detective Chief Inspector Brendon Cullen was equally supportive and said the safety of victims remained the top priority for police.

"As it stands, an apprehended violence order registered in NSW under its legislation has not been effective in Queensland,” he said.

"Being a border town, parties to those apprehended violence orders often cross borders, so it leaves our victims in situations where they don't have protection in Queensland. There are, of course, avenues victims can take by going to a Queensland court and having that apprehended violence order registered in Queensland but this is an additional process our victims can do without.”



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