Biddy the echidna enjoys a bath after being found in Maryborough with cuts on her body. Photo Contributed / Fraser Coast Chronicle
Biddy the echidna enjoys a bath after being found in Maryborough with cuts on her body. Photo Contributed / Fraser Coast Chronicle Contributed

'Biddy' the echidna enjoys a bath after being found injured

BIDDY the echidna was found injured in a backyard in Maryborough with cuts to the back, legs and spines.

With injuries explained only by the nearby slashing work taking place, Biddy was quickly brought to the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital for treatment.

X-rays showed a minor rib fracture but miraculously, due to the nature of the injuries, Biddy's beak remained perfectly intact-a very fortunate occurrence given that damage to an echidna's beak is detrimental to their ability to find food and is, for the most part, irreparable.

The cuts and abrasions to Biddy's back were quite severe and given the unique features of an echidna, the only way to thoroughly disinfect them without the spines getting in the way was an antiseptic bath.

Following Biddy's bubble bath, a team of three worked on removing the residual dirt and hair from between each spine (a long and careful task), before de-ticking the entire body and suturing the deep wound on the front right leg.

Biddy's treating vet, Sharon Griffiths says Biddy is very lucky and the prognosis is looking good.

"Biddy came to us in distress with severe cuts and abrasions on the back and leg, as well as broken, missing and bent spines," she said. 

Apart from the obvious injuries, Biddy is a healthy adult echidna who after a lot of care and attention should be ready to return to life in the wild.

"Echidnas certainly aren't the easiest animals to treat as they pose a few very obvious, very spiky challenges.

"No matter how difficult it may be, it's very rewarding in the end to see such a unique native Australian animal back out in the wild."

Biddy is now taking some time out to recover in the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital's Intensive Care Unit with close observation and monitoring.

Biddy is on a course of antibiotics and pain relief medication to help heal the wounds before eventually being released back into the Maryborough area.

With the echidna's breeding season just around the corner (June - September), Australia Zoo Wildlife Warriors urge everyone to be responsible and drive safely around wildlife populated areas and always keep an eye out for these gorgeous creatures.

To help the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital continue to save the lives of precious patients like Biddy, donate by clicking here.



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