HASTINGS Point Progress Association secretary Julie Boyd says over-development in town caused yesterday's burst water pipe.
HASTINGS Point Progress Association secretary Julie Boyd says over-development in town caused yesterday's burst water pipe. Tweed Daily News/Patrick Williams

Bitumen turns to torrent

HASTINGS Point resident Julie Boyd believes over-development in Hastings Point caused a water pipeline to burst under Tweed Coast Road yesterday.

The cast-iron pipe cracked about 9am opposite Creek and Peninsula streets, opening two splits in the south-bound lane, one measuring more than a metre long, which began spewing water on to the road.

Workers from Tweed Shire Council water unit were on the scene within an hour and water was shut off about 11am.

Ms Boyd, who is also the Hastings Point Progress Association secretary and lives just metres from the main road, fears ratepayers will be left to foot the damage bill.

“We've complained to the Tweed Shire Council, the state government and the local developers over the years that this would happen eventually,” Ms Boyd said yesterday.

“Construction trucks using Tweed Coast Road are damaging our infrastructure and now we will have to pay for it. I've already launched an official complaint with council about it.”

Numerous heavy construction vehicles used Tweed Coast Road on a daily basis, Ms Boyd said.

Witnesses said the water burst through the road after a truck transporting a crane drove over.

“We get buses and cement trucks coming through here all day, every day. It's obviously not good for the road,” Ms Boyd said.

She is calling for heavy vehicles to use another route.

“I think they have a responsibility to fix the problem they've caused here,” she said.

Ms Boyd would like to see the owner of the truck responsible for the leak pay for the damage.

A Tweed Council spokeswoman said workers replaced the cracked cast iron pipe using a stainless steel clamp.

“The line across the road will need replacing some time in the near future, which may require the water to be turned off to nearby streets,” the spokeswoman said.

“Residents will be notified before this occurs.”

Council's water manager Anthony Burnham said such breaks occurred in cast pipes from time to time across the shire, and that this pipe was about 40 years old.

“Breaks such as this can happen due to ground movement and also because cast iron becomes brittle and is more likely to fail as it gets older,” Mr Burnham said.



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