Captain Cook Memorial and Lighthouse.
Captain Cook Memorial and Lighthouse. Rick Koenig

Border facility to be torn down, rebuilt

PREPARATIONS are being made to rebuild the operations room and offices of the Marine Rescue NSW service at Point Danger on the border.

The officers which were built under the Captain Cook Memorial and Lighthouse have numerous defects and is no longer viable to maintain, according to the Tweed Shire Council.

The building will be demolished and then rebuilt later in the year.

The jointly funded project by the Tweed Council, Gold Coast City Council and the NSW government is estimated to cost $2.14 million.

Tweed council's Tracey Stinson said the rebuild of the facility will be in-line with the original design.

"This rebuild is provides us with the opportunity to improve the amenity of this popular vantage point for residents and visitors alike," Ms Stinson said.

Seven new parking spaces will be provided by turning the current parallel parking available on Boundary St to angle-in parking, and new public toilets will be built.

Council stated construction is expected to start by the end on winter.

The proposed design of the building will be discussed at a community meeting at the South Sea Islander Room at the Tweed Shire Council Administrative Centre on Tuesday, March 5.

The meeting will begin at 5.30pm, with the architect and officers from both councils attending to provide their feedback on the project and answer questions.

Residents can also have their say online at www.yoursaytweed.com.au/Captain-Cook-Memorial.



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