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Buried alive for 13 years ... natural reef returns to Kirra

The reef has returned to Kirra.
The reef has returned to Kirra. John Gass /TWE060112beach

A DIVERS' heaven has emerged at Kirra.

The natural reef, covered by sand for years, has risen to the delight of divers and marine animals alike.

Griffith University coastal researcher Rodger Tomlinson said when the Tweed River Entrance Bypassing Project began in 2001, Kirra reef was buried in sand.

For years, the Kirra outlet has operated only occasionally - and an abundance of sea life has appeared.

"They're interesting reef systems on the Gold Coast and Northern NSW," Mr Tomlinson said.

"There's a good deal of interest to see how it develops."

While there's no extensive archive of sand flow around Point Danger prior to the 1960s - when the rock walls were built - Mr Tomlinson said the Kirra reef was naturally covered with sand from time to time.

"The key is that in the past, the reef was covered naturally."

For now, he said it's great to see the reef thriving.

"The Gold Coast City Council is very keen to develop a more extensive diving industry," he said.

Topics:  kirra tweed river



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