Road safety: Carole Keast thinks the new bypass road is deteriorating but council says it will be alright in the end.
Road safety: Carole Keast thinks the new bypass road is deteriorating but council says it will be alright in the end.

Bypass potholes only temporary

RESIDENTS have questioned the condition of the long awaited Piggabeen Road bypass, with council responding that the current surface is only temporary.

The bypass will permanently open next Wednesday and Tweed resident Carole Keast said she fears the road is already deteriorating.

“It's only been a week but the brand new road is already falling apart as we drive on it, you have to watch out for the potholes,” Ms Keast said.

“I would like the shire council to be held accountable for the quality of work they produce.”

Ms Keast said she has used the bypass road two to three times a day since it became available.

“This is not a joke, every time I drive past there are council workers standing around doing nothing. Today I drove past and there were eight workers just standing and staring at a loader,” Ms Keast said.

“They were just standing with their hands in their pockets and nothing looks worse.”

The road is currently open to one lane of traffic during work hours as crews connect the old road to the new bypass.

A spokeswoman for Tweed Shire Council said the bitumen surface of the road is temporary to allow for settlement due to the installation of new water and sewer mains recently installed underground.

“When the settlement process is complete, council will lay down a new asphaltic concrete (bitumen) surface,” she said.

“Council will then monitor the seal until it has settled to a satisfactory point.”

The council spokeswoman said each person working on the project was required to be there.

“Everyone there has something to do, sometimes they have to wait as it is not a continuous process,” the spokesperson said.

“Many of the workers are there because of health and safety reasons – when there are powerlines involved there always has to be one person watching for safety reasons.”

With the bypass complete, work can begin in 2011/2012 on a major reconstruction of the existing Piggabeen Road.



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