FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: Dom Knight, Dan Ilic (hungry beast, can of worms) and Russel Howcroft (Channel 10) at the Forum Tent as a part of the Can We Trust The Media debate at Splendour In The Grass.
FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: Dom Knight, Dan Ilic (hungry beast, can of worms) and Russel Howcroft (Channel 10) at the Forum Tent as a part of the Can We Trust The Media debate at Splendour In The Grass.

Splendour discussion: Can you trust the media?

Julian Assange file photo
Julian Assange file photo

WHEN watching a band isn't enough, you can always dose up on a little debate at the Splendour Forum.

Yesterday's Can We Trust The Media? debate included a video recording from WikiLeaks editor in chief, Julian Assange who used the forum to tell the audience his political party's policies and to draw in a few members to the party, calling this generation a part of the largest bullshit detecting machine.

The policies included:

 "We'll oppose any attempts to privatise the ABC and SBS in part and in full. Tony Abbott denies this is on the Coalition agenda, but we all know he answers to Rupert Murdoch," he said from his base in the Ecuadorian Embassy in London.

 "We'll push for measures to help non-profit media and non-profit news organisations. The print media still dominates the way political information is originated, even online. We badly need diversification of the Australian media. To assist this we will make donations to Australian media organisations tax-deductible.

 "We will revolutionise media and music innovation by introducing an Australian content innovation fund, easily accessed by any Australian."

The debate included arguments from comedian Dan Ilic, Network Ten executive general manager Russel Howcroft, The Chaser's Dom Knight and writer/comedian Alice Fraser as well as a few vocal hecklers who were told to shut up or get out.

Ilic used his time to bring former boss Howcroft to task, changing his Wikipedia page to prove his point (it was returned to its previous form within hours).

His views were countered by Crikey journalist Andrew Crook, who argued the majority of Ilic's points were inaccurate; proving the need for real journalism in Australia.

The verdict was still out on who we should trust.

The tent hosts less political forums for the next two days including Q&A with documentary filmmaker Kaye Harrison for The Sunnyboy today and the Comedy Story Club tomorrow.



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