Carrie Bickmore breaks down on The Project over Syria

WARNING: Disturbing content

THE PROJECT'S Carrie Bickmore broke down and Waleed Aly was lost for words following a confronting report on the chemical attacks in Syria

"I don't think I have anything optimistic to say about it," a speechless Aly said following a report on the devastating attack.

More than 70 people, including dozens of women and children, died in what medical agencies say was probably a sarin gas attack on the town of Khan Sheikhoun.

 

 

Since the attack, confronting photos of children foaming at the mouth, suffering convulsions and being carried away shocked the world.

And following Thursday night's update on the Channel Ten program, its hosts couldn't hide their emotion.

"Sorry ... I know I was going to start this conversation, but I can't watch those images," Bickmore said, tearing up as her voice wavered.

"I know that our tears, our feeling so sad, they aren't going to do anything.

"And I know us sitting here in safe Australia, us feeling sad for these people doesn't change anything.

"What can Trump do? Will he change his mind? Will he act?

A Syrian child receives treatment at a hospital in Khan Sheikhun, a rebel-held town in the northwestern Syrian Idlib province, following an attack.

Abdul-Hamid Alyousef, 29, holds his twin babies who were killed during a suspected chemical weapons attack.
Abdul-Hamid Alyousef, 29, holds his twin babies who were killed during a suspected chemical weapons attack.

Her co-host Aly, usually prepared to tackle any issue, was lost for words.

"I don't think I have anything optimistic to say about it," he said, as he took a moment to think.

"He's manoeuvred himself into a hopeless situation as far as responding to this is concerned," Aly said about President Trump.

"His relentless focus on ISIL as being the only thing that matters in the Middle East has meant that he effectively has been saying very nice things about the al-Assad regime. He is effectively backing the way they respond to ISIL and taking the fight to terrorism and that sort of stuff and it overlooks that this is what goes on in this war."

Abdul-Hamid Alyousef, 29, holds his twin babies who were killed during a suspected chemical weapons attack.
Aly concluded: "I can't say anything good to you, Carrie. I can't. The United Nations can't do anything because Russia will veto."

A Syrian child receives treatment at a hospital in Khan Sheikhun, a rebel-held town in the northwestern Syrian Idlib province, following an attack.
A Syrian child receives treatment at a hospital in Khan Sheikhun, a rebel-held town in the northwestern Syrian Idlib province, following an attack.

 

Among the images to shock the world following the strike was a photo of a devastated father holding his deceased twins in his arms after they were killed in the attack.

"Imagine the dad with his twins dead in his arms?" Bickmore said through tears.

"I don't know what more we can say really," Aly said.

News Corp Australia


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