High-profile MP slams Palaszczuk’s push for civil unions

ONE of Queensland's highest profile politicians has slammed Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk's plans to introduce civil partnerships.

Opposition leader Lawrence Springborg told APN Newsdesk a short while ago that Ms Palaszczuk should not be pursuing her pre-election promise to give same-sex couples the chance to have their relationships  recognised as civil unions.

"The LNP is yet to study the detail of the Bill but we are surprised, irrespective of people's views on this issue, that Labor believes this should be a greater priority than job creation and employment stability for Queenslanders and their families," Mr Springborg, the member for the Southern Downs, said.

"It would be wrong to allow for same sex civil union ceremonies that mimic marriage ceremonies to proceed ahead of Australians themselves being given a say on the issue of same-sex marriage."

The bill, if passed, will allow couples of any gender to have their relationship listed on the Registrar of Births, Deaths and Marriages.

Ms Palaszczuk's announcement follows new Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull's decision to not let MPs have a free vote on same-sex marriage.

Instead he is sticking with former PM Tony Abbott's plan to hold a plebiscite on the issue after the next election.

Australian Marriage Equality national director Rodney Croome urged politicians to go further and legalise same-sex marriage.

"I welcome the Queensland government's civil partnership bill because it will provide same-sex couples with greater legal certainty," Mr Croome said.

"But civil partnerships are not a substitute for equality in marriage for same-sex couples.

"Marriage is a universally recognised institution that guarantees equal respect and equal rights in a way civil partnerships cannot."

Parents and Friends of Lesbians and Gays national spokeswoman Shelley Argent, who has a gay child, said the gay and lesbian couples deserved to have their relationships recognised.

"It is extremely important, it is showing that this government is supportive of their need to be recognised and their relationships," Mrs Argent said.

"I think as a straight person we cannot really understand the impact this will have."

Ms Palaszczuk said the bill was important for straight couples who did not want to marry and for gay couples who wanted to show their commitment to each other.

"We are restoring this right - which was first permitted under a Labor Government and then taken away as one of the first acts of the former LNP Government - because every Queensland couple - no matter of their gender - should have this right," she said.

"It's time to again allow heterosexual couples who might want to affirm their relationship but not take the step of actually getting married the right to do so.

"We know how important that recognition is to all couples not only because it gives their relationship official legal status - but because it allows them official declaration of their love and devotion."

In 2012, the Newman Government changed civil partnerships to registered relationships.

- APN NEWSDESK

© iStockphoto.com/johnnyscriv

10:15 AM Civil partnerships 'don't go far enough' says campaigner

THERE were mixed responses to the Queensland Government's plan to re-introduce civil partnerships to the state.

Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk revealed the plan this morning in Parliament.

One high profile gay activist said civil partnerships "were not a substitute for marriage" while a another campaigner backed the move.

The LNP is yet to reveal how it will react to the bill, expected to be introduced this afternoon, and did not respond to APN Newsdesk's request for comment.

Ms Palaszczuk's announcement follows new Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull's decision to not let MPs have a free vote on same-sex marriage.

Instead he is sticking with former PM Tony Abbott's plan to hold a plebiscite on the issue after the next election.
Australian Marriage Equality national director Rodney Croome urged politicians to go further and legalise same-sex marriage.

"I welcome the Queensland government's civil partnership bill because it will provide same-sex couples with greater legal certainty," Mr Croome said.

"But civil partnerships are not a substitute for equality in marriage for same-sex couples.
"Marriage is a universally recognised institution that guarantees equal respect and equal rights in a way civil partnerships cannot."

Parents and Friends of Lesbians and Gays national spokeswoman Shelley Argent, who has a gay child, said the gay and lesbian couples deserved to have their relationships recognised.

"It is extremely important, it is showing that this government is supportive of their need to be recognised and their relationships," Mrs Argent said.

"I think as a straight person we cannot really understand the impact this will have."

Ms Palaszczuk said the bill was important for straight couples who did not want to marry and for gay couples who wanted to show their commitment to each other.

"We are restoring this right - which was first permitted under a Labor Government and then taken away as one of the first acts of the former LNP Government - because every Queensland couple - no matter of their gender - should have this right," she said.

"It's time to again allow heterosexual couples who might want to affirm their relationship but not take the step of actually getting married the right to do so.

"We know how important that recognition is to all couples not only because it gives their relationship official legal status - but because it allows them official declaration of their love and devotion."

- APN NEWSDESK



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