John Ede from Reel Fishing Charters and Peter Bolic from Sea Master fishing charters at the Tweed Bar.
John Ede from Reel Fishing Charters and Peter Bolic from Sea Master fishing charters at the Tweed Bar. Blainey Woodham

Conditions on the Tweed bar worsen with no action in sight

BACK in February My Daily News ran a story on the dangers of the Tweed Bar, and the NSW and QLD State Governments' apparent plans to dredge it.

It was hoped this would fix the problem for boaties and professional fisherman/charter operators alike.

Five months later and the bar has become more treacherous, according to Tweed fishing charter owners.

It is a danger to cross in any sort of swell and operators like Peter Bolic and John Ede are still waiting for something to be done.

"It's become a lot worse since the beginning of the year, it's a wonder someone hasn't gone under the last couple of weeks," Mr Bolic said.

Experienced professionals are more worried about the recreational fishermen with less knowledge of bar conditions.

As Mr Ede looked over the bar from the Break wall at Duranbah he told My Daily News the sand build up had worsened substantially.

It has become a lot worse since the beginning of the year, it's a wonder someone hasn't gone under the last couple of weeks, Mr Bolic said.

"We take a hard right as we come around the left side of the break wall, previously this was safe but now we have the sand built up there as well which is creating dangerous conditions.

"If you don't have a boat with substantial speed you can get yourself in trouble very easily," Mr Ede said.

Radio controller John McGovern from Marine Rescue at Point Danger watches over the bar on a daily basis and gave his take on the situation.

"Look, it is a navigable crossing but it becomes very dangerous in any swell, you really need to have your wits about you."

"It has not been dredged in nearly 3 years, it would be really good to have it done," Mr McGovern said.

John McClymont from the Department Of Primary Industries said the River mouth is monitored on a regular basis.

"The entrance is closely monitored under the Tweed River Entrance Sand Bypass Project with seabed surveys conducted around every three months."

"The results of these surveys determine the need for any dredging, such as when substantial shoaling encroaches the navigation channel.

"The most recent survey was conducted in late April and the results confirmed the channel had been maintained to that point in time. "Accordingly, no dredging was undertaken," Mr McClymont said.



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