Feature

Contractors keep the mines moving

 

The resources and energy industry relies on contractors and downstream service providers to keep the sector moving - organisations like drilling contractor Ensign International Energy Services.

With more than 55 years experience working in Australia, the Adelaide-based company operates as the international division of Ensign Energy Services Inc of Canada, a global industry leader in the delivery of services to the oil and gas sector with more than 7,000 employees.

Ensign's Australian operations focus on the oil and gas hotspots in Queensland, Western Australia, NSW, and around the Cooper Basin in South Australia. 

The company also operates in New Zealand, the Middle East, North and West Africa, North and South America and South East Asia and works with most of the major oil exploration and production companies throughout the world.

Ensign Vice President Operations Gene Gaz said the company was constantly seeking out new personnel to meet the demands of the fast paced Australian drilling industry now and into the future.

"We know the best people are in demand," Mr Gaz said. 

"That is why Ensign offers a complete employment package not just a day rate."

Every Ensign worksite is focused on protecting the health and safety of its employees, as well as protecting local communities and the environment, providing  a structure under which employees are able to learn, create opportunities for advancement and find fulfilment in their work.

Ensign targets recruits with a high level of mental and physical fitness, as well as an employment history of working in remote localities and used to extended absences from home.

"We are always considering candidates who are career orientated and have a high level of motivation with a high work ethic and personal pride. These recruits are more likely to succeed in our industry," Mr Gaz said.

The crew on an average rig consists of six or seven workers, although that may vary depending on the type of actual drilling operation and the size of the rig.

In addition to the drilling crews, there are a multitude of other people who also work on the rig site such as geologists, engineers, catering staff and various client representatives.

Mr Gaz said Ensign employees work with leading edge technology saving time, money and effort.

"Innovation is at the core of everything we do at Ensign," he said.

"Our commitment to delivering world leading technology for our clients is without parallel among our competitors."

Mr Gaz said Ensign employees are also expected to possess professional qualities that enhance the company's service to its customers, including a focus on quality, safety, financial excellence and efficiency

"A service quality mindset relies on frequent and open communication with our customers as we strive to meet or exceed their evolving needs," he said.

"Our customer focus is the differentiator between Ensign and the myriad of other oil services contractors.

"This kind of customer focus supports our strategic vision to be the contractor of choice in all segments of our business."

An employee with sufficient experience and training - and an interest in progressing further in the industry - may be offered a position on one of Ensign's many rigs overseas.

These rigs are often located in remote regions such as deserts, jungle or ice-bound tundra where human habitation can be tough. These locations are subject to extreme temperatures, from searing heat of over 50 degrees Celsius, oppressive humidity or below freezing.

"As an Ensign employee you have the opportunity to work at the industry's cutting edge, building the skills and experience coveted across the oil and gas sector, and earning respect, the income and the benefits that rewards hard work and enables a great lifestyle," Mr Gaz said.

Learn more online: visit the Ensign Energy website

Topics:  contractors employment mining resources



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