No sand: Vince and Angela Kachel want something done about erosion at the southern end of Kingscliff Beach and would like to see the few remaining trees on the disappearing dune saved.
No sand: Vince and Angela Kachel want something done about erosion at the southern end of Kingscliff Beach and would like to see the few remaining trees on the disappearing dune saved. Blainey Woodham

Council 'letting Kingscliff erode'

ANGER is building at Kingscliff over a perceived lack of action from authorities as the ocean continues to eat up coastal vegetation and moves closer to taking out a road.

Sand has eroded at the south end of Kings-scliff Beach, near the northern Cudgen Creek break wall, since at least November.

In the past week, most of the dune's long-standing trees, including a number of pandanus, have toppled, and residents say 60cm of ground has been lost since Wednesday.

The dune protection fence has already been compromised and if erosion continues at the rate of this week, the nearby road will be under threat within a fortnight.

Bert and Jocelyn Lankford have lived in Kingscliff since 1948 and said they had never seen the beach like it was now.

“It is unbelievable to see the amount of erosion that is down there,” Mr Lankford said.

“I have been speaking to council and they told me as soon as the ocean calms down they will commence pumping of sand from the creek, which is badly needed.”

But he said so far council had succeeded in doing “bugger all” about the problem. Mrs Lankford agreed.

“All the trees are gone; there are only about half-a-dozen left there,” she said.

“It started in November last year and now it is months later and still nothing is being done.”

Mrs Lankford said she used to be able to walk with her grandkids to the end of the break wall, but yesterday an hour after low tide, water was lapping the base of the break wall.

Michelle Vandenbroek is another resident who wants action.

“Are we going to sit and watch the beach wash away? It is already too late for the trees and the danger now is for the road,” she said.

“It is a beautiful beach vanishing in front of our eyes and thousands and thousands of dollars worth of pandanus trees disappearing before our eyes. It is sad to see. This problem could have been fixed months ago.”

Vince Kachel was at the creek yesterday and wanted to see the remaining pandanus on the dunes saved. It is believed the trees were planted in the early 1990s.

A Tweed Shire Council spokeswoman said council was still negotiating with the State Government to pump sand from Cudgen Creek onto the eroded beach.



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