TWEED mayor Kevin Skinner.
TWEED mayor Kevin Skinner.

Council's monitoring myrtle fungus

TWEED mayor Kevin Skinner said the council is monitoring the fungus, myrtle rust, with the best defence being education.

The fungus disease affects Australian native plants including bottle brush, tea tree and eucalyptus and produces masses of powdery bright yellow or orange-yellow spores on infected plant parts, which may cause leaves to become buckled, twisted or even die.

Cr Skinner said the council was not taking it lightly.

“Council are taking this seriously, it has the potential to cause serious harm, especially in tea tree plantations,” he said.

“Our intentions are to let everyone know what it’s all about, and we are trying to get a colour picture in this week’s Tweed Link of myrtle rust to do so.”

Tweed Shire Council bushland officer John Turnbull said the council were doing more then putting information in the Tweed Link.

“We have notified all council staff who work with plants or in bushland areas and all bushland restoration contractors on our panel of providers to make sure they can identify myrtle rust,” he said.

“We will be displaying Department of Primary Industries information posters at Tweed Heads and Murwillumbah Offices and at parks and gardens depots/nurseries.

“We want to get the information out to the broader public.”

Mr Turnbull said all they could do was wait.

“It’s quite a worry, it could have a devastating impact,” he said.

“We can only hope there is some natural resistance.”

For further information on myrtle rust, visit www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/biosecurity/plant/myrtle-rust.



Four things to do this weekend

Four things to do this weekend

There's plenty happening across the Tweed this weekend

Jon prepares to lose his locks on his own terms

Jon prepares to lose his locks on his own terms

Bilambil man to cut dreadlocks to raise money for cancer

Sunny weekend set for the Tweed

Sunny weekend set for the Tweed

It's set to be a sunny weekend for the Tweed.

Local Partners