SANDPIT: Pre-loading at the Cudgen development will set the foundations for the future project but the sand fill has some neighbours worried about the eventual height of the development.
SANDPIT: Pre-loading at the Cudgen development will set the foundations for the future project but the sand fill has some neighbours worried about the eventual height of the development. Scott Powick

Cudgen estate developers defend giant sand piles

GIANT sand hills at a Cudgen development have left some residents concerned about the potential impact on their homes.

The development, which is expected to eventually be the site of about 90 new homes, is being built by Intrapac Property Developers on Gales Holdings land at the corner of Tweed Coast Rd and Crescent St, Cudgen.

While the piles of sand have been slowly pumped onto the site over the past few months, many Tweed residents are still raising concerns on social media about what the sand is needed for and whether it's suitable for the flood-prone area.

Tweed Shire Council's head of Development Assessment, Lindsay McGavin, confirmed the fill is being used to compact the earthworks ahead of development, which he said is "standard geo-technical practice” and is entirely safe. "The fill is for what is called pre-loading,” he said.

"It's to get the weight so that the earthworks compact properly. There is an extra one metre of fill to achieve this. It could be pre-loading for three months but depends on geo-technical testing. The excess will be removed when proper compaction has occurred.”

Intrapac Chief Operating Officer Max Shifman said the sand would only be temporary to help with the development.

"The excess sand at Cudgen will only be in place temporarily, as per our approval,” Mr Shifman said.

"Once the sand is properly compacted, the height will be reduced to the required levels for the development to proceed. 

"These works are a completely normal part of land development and there will be no lasting effects to the local community.”

Gales Holdings director Dr Stephen Segal said the final site will meet guide-lines set out by the council.

"The level will be shaved off and it'll be reshaped according to the approved level,” he said.

While the subdivision was approved in 1994 and a construction certificate was issued in 2016, a local real estate agent, who asked not to be named, told Tweed Daily News some residents were concerned over whether the height of the development will impact their property values.

"I don't think they expected it to be that high,” the agent said.

"One lady I did an appraisal for around there said she was really worried.”



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