RIP SEAN: Bonnie and Brett Scovell from Biggenden with the canvas prints of their beloved son Sean who was tragically lost in a mining accident early in June in the garden they are creating to hold his ashes. Photo Rose Hamilton-Barr / Central & North Burnett Times
RIP SEAN: Bonnie and Brett Scovell from Biggenden with the canvas prints of their beloved son Sean who was tragically lost in a mining accident early in June in the garden they are creating to hold his ashes. Photo Rose Hamilton-Barr / Central & North Burnett Times Rose Hamilton-Barr

Dad feels strain of drawn out case over son’s quarry death

BRETT Scovell, the father of Sean Scovell, said another delay in the case surrounding his son's death was "gut-wrenching".

Magistrate Ross Risson reserved until January 30 his decision on whether to strike out charges relating to Mr Scovell's 2012 death at a quarry near Moranbah.

Sean Scovell - a former Kepnock High School student - died on June 5 after he became entangled in a conveyor belt.

Two companies - Global Crushers and MCG Quarries - and five people are being prosecuted on a total of 24 charges related to the incident.

Mr Scovell said it was disappointing things were continually being dragged out.

"There's people that need closure and we're going on towards two-and-a-half years now," he said.

"This just drags and drags and drags.

"Knowing that we've got to relive again, every time it comes up, those times prior to, during and after are just horrendous."

Mr Scovell and his wife Bonnie run the service station in Biggenden and could not make it to the court appearance.

"It's terrible because I feel guilt ridden that I'm not there to support my son," he said.

"We've got a seven-day-a week business being a service station in a little country town, so for me to go I've got to pay thousands of dollars a day or because we're the only service station in town, people don't get their fuel."

Mr Scovell said it would be "financially burdening" to make the trip to Mackay for every court date involved in his son's case.

"I have a lot of faith in these charges but I just can't understand these delays," Mr Scovell said.

"I think it's a thing the big companies tend to do," he said.

"Luckily we've got the government on our side."



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