Carmel Jones and Bernie Gabriel from the Marine Rescue Point Danger get ready for the end of the annual border time warp.
Carmel Jones and Bernie Gabriel from the Marine Rescue Point Danger get ready for the end of the annual border time warp. Scott Powick

It's time to wind back the clocks

LIKE many other border-dwellers, Marine Rescue Point Danger volunteers will breathe a sigh of relief tomorrow morning.

The organisation, which resides in both states, will join New South Wales residents as they wind back their clocks an hour, ending daylight saving for another six months.

Commander Bernie Gabriel said they operated on NSW time, but kept a Queensland clock handy to avoid confusion.

“It never really worried us because this place operates 24 hours a day, but it does become annoying,” Mr Gabriel said.

“It doesn’t make life easy.

“Anything going north over the border has to be logged in Queensland time.

“But everything else is in NSW time.”

Mr Gabriel said if boaties radioed their return times without specifying which state it could cause confusion.

“If the boat is overdue and we can’t make contact with them we have to call the police and send our boat out,” he said.

“Sometimes we’ll have two boats sitting next to each other radioing in time an hour different.”

Daylight saving will recommence on October 2.

 

BACK IN TIME:

Turn your clock back an hour before going to bed tonight.



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