TWEED Shire councillor Barry Longland, Mayor Warren Polglase, Solo Resource administration director Gillian Richards and commercial director Robert Richards officially launched the Tweed's new hi-tech, multi-bin waste-recovery system on Tuesday.
TWEED Shire councillor Barry Longland, Mayor Warren Polglase, Solo Resource administration director Gillian Richards and commercial director Robert Richards officially launched the Tweed's new hi-tech, multi-bin waste-recovery system on Tuesday. Blainey Woodham/ Tweed Daily News

Don't get sent to sin bin

BIN Brother is coming to your rubbish bin this December.

He'll be watching how you use your new multi-bin rubbish system, and if you don't “Do The Right Bin”, you will be “educated”.

Garbage collectors will soon have technology at their disposal in new rubbish trucks to mark your address on a GPS map should your recycling bin be contaminated with non-recyclable waste.

And more than 100,000 new bins to be rolled out across the shire as part of Tweed Shire Council's (TSC) new system will also be installed with Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) chips, which will electronically link a bin to its home and record other data about how it is used. The high-tech approach to rubbish collection has been created in an attempt to lift the Tweed's recycling rate from 35 per cent to the State Government's target of 66 per cent by 2014.

In 77 years of servicing the Tweed's waste, the Richards family has seen massive advances in rubbish collection technology.

Robert Richards, Commercial Director of Solo Resource Recovery told the Tweed Daily News that Council had taken a visionary approach to waste collection.

“Bins will be fitted with an RFID tag which will record each bin lifted to keep a tab on presentation rates, and through a GPS system the driver can push a button in the truck, which will register a contaminated bin so a waste educator can go out and advise what is contamination and what is not,” Mr Richards said.

“There will be a big impact on the process of recycling products, with far less contamination between the different bins.”

Mr Richards said the RFID chip would also help find stolen rubbish bins and settle disputes over bin ownership between neighbours.

According to TSC, for the first offence of contaminated rubbish, the bin will be tagged. On the second occasion, education material about the correct use of the bins will be mailed to the residents. On the third occasion, the residents are issued with a final warning, and after that the bins would be removed.

So what counts as “contaminated recycling”?

Mr Richards said a common mistake was putting ceramics and crockery into recycling bins; green waste, plate glass and pyrex are also non-recyclable.

“And I have to say nappies; a lot of people think nappies are recyclable, but nappies definitely go in the garbage,” Mr Richards said.

The cost of implementing the new system was included in the recently signed seven-year contract between Solo and TSC, so cannot be reported as it is commercial-in-confidence.

Tweed Mayor Warren Polglase welcomed the new multi-bin system.

“We urge everyone to 'Do the Right Bin' by becoming familiar with the new coloured lids on the new bins - red for garbage, yellow for recycling and green for the optional organics service,” Mr Polglase said.

The new bins are already being rolled out, but collection won't start until December 1.



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