All in the name of raising money for prostate cancer research, Don and Elaine Lynch will take a 630km bike ride from Bundaberg to Nerang.
All in the name of raising money for prostate cancer research, Don and Elaine Lynch will take a 630km bike ride from Bundaberg to Nerang. Ron Burgin

Don's push to defeat cancer

DON Lynch knew when he was diagnosed with prostate cancer he would have a long road to travel.

Now a prostate cancer survivor Mr Lynch, 73, and his wife Elaine, 74, are embarking on a 630km bike ride from Bundaberg to Nerang on the Gold Coast in an effort to raise money to help combat the disease.

My Lynch looked at the trek as a way to pay back the support he was given during his illness.

“I have been lucky and they (the Cancer Council of Queensland) have been supportive,” he said.

The ride begins on April 5 at the Bundaberg RSL and will take 14 days with Mr and Mrs Lynch stopping at RSLs along the way to collect the money which has been raised in each town for the cause.

Mrs Lynch said she was not worried about the ride and they had both completed similar and larger-sized rides recently, including cycling from Bundaberg to Townsville in 2008.

“I don't worry about things with Don along because he looks after me,” Mrs Lynch said.

The money raised will be donated to the Cancer Council of Queensland for prostate cancer research.

Bundaberg and District Prostate Cancer Support Group convenor Rob McCulloch gave his support to Mr and Mrs Lynch and said the ride would also help raise awareness of prostate cancer, which was just as important as raising money for research.

Prostate cancer survivor Mr McCulloch said recent statistics show the disease to be more lethal than breast cancer with more men dying of prostate cancer than women of breast cancer in the past year.

“It is a shocking statistic. It is like rusting a car - once the cancer gets through there is not much more you can do,” Mr McCulloch.

Mr McCulloch said the emotional drain on prostate cancer suffers can be as damaging as the physical effects and the support group was there to help suffers through them.

“It is very emotional, some people tend to be withdrawn or depressed - we just try to get people out and talking,” he said.

Bundaberg and District Prostate Cancer Support Group meets every fourth Thursday in The Family Centre, Bundaberg Showgrounds.

For more information telephone Mr McCulloch on 4159 9419.

Prostate cancer facts
  • 3600 Australian men die of prostate cancer each year
  • Each year 18,700 men are diagnosed with prostrate cancer in Australia
  • Men over 50 should be tested for prostate cancer once a year


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