Every night at sunset, people from around the world can tune into a live stream penguin parade which shows thousands of Little Penguins waddling up the beach in Phillip Island to their homes.

While visitors are not currently allowed to watch in person due to COVID restrictions, Phillip Island Nature Parks has been hosting the event via social media since August.

However, in Thursday night's live stream a ranger had to come to the rescue after a penguin was spotted with plastic tangled around its neck.

The penguin was waddling along the sand, struggling to keep upright when an expert commentator pointed out that while he looked "nice, fat and healthy", it appeared as though "something recent had been stuck around his neck".

A nightly parade shows live footage of up to 3,000 Little Penguins emerging from Bass Strait after fishing, and waddling up the beach in Phillip Island to their homes. Picture: Live Penguin TV
A nightly parade shows live footage of up to 3,000 Little Penguins emerging from Bass Strait after fishing, and waddling up the beach in Phillip Island to their homes. Picture: Live Penguin TV

"It looks like it could be something plastic which is not good. We certainly don't want that for our little penguins and we do have a wildlife hospital here at the penguin parade where we will take any sick or injured penguins to help protect them and rehabilitate them and release them back in the wild, " the concerned commentator said.

"It is really important we dispose of our rubbish correctly. So that's anything whether it be a plastic bag or mask. That looked like a hair tie - make sure you cut them up and put them in the bin.

The clip then shows ranger Jordan releasing him again after removing the ring around its neck.

But during Thursday night’s live stream one penguin was spotted with a plastic ring around its neck. Picture: Live Penguin TV
But during Thursday night’s live stream one penguin was spotted with a plastic ring around its neck. Picture: Live Penguin TV

The relieved penguin could then be seen waddling off so fast the camera struggled to keep up with him as he continued his journey home.

The adorable footage has been met plenty of reaction online with social media users praising the ranger for her efforts.

"Us waddle watches (those who watch Penguin live TV regularly) named that penguin "Jordy" after the Ranger (Jordan) who rescued him," one person explained on Facebook.

"Great teamwork Meagan and Jordan," another person wrote.

"Wonderful story with great outcome," a third person added, while a fourth said it, "Good news for my day."

An expert commentator looked concerned after she noticed something unusual around the penguin’s neck. Picture: Live Penguin TV
An expert commentator looked concerned after she noticed something unusual around the penguin’s neck. Picture: Live Penguin TV

Phillip Island's much-loved Penguin Parade allows fans in Victoria and around the world to watch the famous procession online when they can't see it in person due to current travel restrictions.

According to Phillip Island Nature Parks who host the event, the parade is believed to be the world's first nightly live stream of a natural wildlife event with expert commentary.

The nightly Parade shows live footage of up to 3,000 Little Penguins emerging from Bass Strait after fishing, and waddling up the beach to return to their burrows.

A ranger managed to locate the penguin and successfully remove the plastic ring. She then released the penguin back into the parade. Picture: Live Penguin TV
A ranger managed to locate the penguin and successfully remove the plastic ring. She then released the penguin back into the parade. Picture: Live Penguin TV

The stream coincides with the annual breeding season, with cute and fluffy penguin chicks starting to fill the hundreds of burrows scattered across sand dunes above the wild beach.

The idea to do a live stream parade came after BBC commentator Andrew Cotter showcased Phillip Island's penguins in a segment to people from all over the world.

The penguin looked to be in good spirits as he quickly waddled off and continued his journey home. Picture: Live Penguin TV
The penguin looked to be in good spirits as he quickly waddled off and continued his journey home. Picture: Live Penguin TV

"The Andrew Cotter video and Tourism Australia exposure reminded us all how entertaining and loved our Little Penguins are, and Live Penguin TV will now allow everyone in the world to enjoy this special event every night,'' Phillip Island Nature Parks chief executive Catherine Basterfield said in a statement.

"The Little Penguins have missed having the crowds watching them every night, so I'm sure they will put on a good show for the cameras.''

The live parade is on 6pm every night on Facebook or YouTube.

Originally published as Dramatic penguin rescue live on-air



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